Canadian Institutes of Health Research - A Framework for International Relations and Cooperation

February 2006

Table of Contents

Executive Summary
1.0 Background
2.0 The Context for CIHR’s International Relations
2.1 Situational Analysis
2.1.1 International Developments
2.1.2 Canadian Situation
2.1.3 Health Research
2.2 Federal Government Directions
2.3 Global Health and CIHR’s International Relations
2.4 Challenges and Opportunities
3.0 International Strategic Priorities and Principles
3.1 Strategic Priorities
3.2 Principles for Selection among Opportunities
3.3 Priority Partner Countries
4.0 Operational Model: Roles and Responsibilities
5.0 Outcomes and Evaluation
6.0 Conclusion

Appendices
Appendix A: Initiatives to Address the International Framework Priorities – Resource Requirements


Executive Summary

Vision: The Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) is a global leader in health research as a result of its pivotal contributions to the international advancement of health research and by making international involvement pervasive in its programming.

Mission: To lead, stimulate and facilitate effective Canadian international involvement in health research that benefits Canadians and the global community.

From its inception CIHR has been active internationally. Institutes and Branches have collaborated with many non-Canadian organizations and we also inherited international links from the Medical Research Council. Our international work has led to cutting-edge science and contributed to the health of Canadians and people throughout the world. This framework recognizes the importance of international engagement to continuing scientific excellence and to CIHR’s success in achieving its mandate.

The goal of this framework is to provide coherence and guidance to the components of CIHR to ensure they choose wisely among increasing opportunities for international collaboration, and thus are as effective as possible in their international work. We will update and modify the framework in light of CIHR’s experiences, Canadian government priorities and the changing international scene.

Priorities

CIHR has five strategic priorities for its international work:

  1. Research - Priority A: Broker and stimulate productive and mutually beneficial health-research collaborations among Canadian researchers, institutions and firms and their international colleagues and counterparts organizations. The focus of these collaborations must be guided by Institute and CIHR-wide priorities..

    Research - Priority B: Contribute to and support CIHR’s international involvement in specific research subjects.

  2. Talent: Build programs for trainees and established health researchers to ensure Canada contributes to the development of health-research capacity both internationally and at home so scientists are internationally connected and competitive.

  3. Global Health: Address internationally recognized priorities in global health research.

  4. Safety and Security: Develop research initiatives to address emerging health threats to Canada and the global community.

  5. Organizational Best Practices: Lead the international exchange of best practices regarding health-research policies and management.

To achieve these priorities, CIHR will develop systems to gather and share knowledge to support and strengthen relations with Canadian and international stakeholders.

Opportunities to work internationally should be assessed by five principles:

  • Alignment with CIHR mission and priorities
  • Alignment with federal government priorities
  • Consistency and synergy with Canada’s role and activities
  • Likelihood of success and impact
  • Resource implications

Applying these principles to a project will usually clarify whether it would make an appropriate international collaboration. However, CIHR also has countries we particularly encourage Institutes and Branches to work with; among high-income countries, they are the United States, Japan and European nations and among emerging economies they are India, China and Mexico. Rather than listing low-income countries, we encourage Institutes and Branches to consider projects in light of the country’s:

  • Population health status
  • Current health system and health-research system
  • Emerging health threats (such as HIV and avian flu)
  • Political stability and the rule of law
  • Historical relations with Canada

Operational Model: Roles and Responsibilities

Responsibility for implementing this framework will vary; different Institutes or Branches take the lead where an international initiative relates predominately to its area. Most international collaborations are developed and implemented by Institutes, but Branches in the Ottawa office can lead some. The International Relations Unit co-ordinates organization-wide initiatives, provides support to Institutes and Branches, leads the gathering and dissemination of best practices and other tools and is responsible for co-ordinating and monitoring use of the framework.

Outcomes and Evaluation

To assess use of the framework, CIHR will monitor indicators linked to the priorities and related outcomes and periodically evaluate the results.

1.0 Background

Canada, despite a relatively small population, has a long tradition of international involvement to support its success in all areas of national importance. International trade is crucial to economic prosperity and our diplomatic work has earned Canada a respected place in world councils.

Canada’s participation at the cutting-edge of health research is also built on a foundation of international involvement. Canadian health researchers recognize that advancements in science occur throughout the world and to achieve excellence in health research, it is essential to be connected with those developments. Many researchers complete some training in another country, participate with colleagues from around the world in research projects, attend and host international scientific meetings, and maintain regular contact with colleagues around the globe. A study done for the Office of the National Science Advisor found that in 2003 over 40 per cent of scientific papers authored by Canadians included one or more non-Canadian co-authors. It also demonstrated this form of international collaboration has increased significantly in the previous decade, up from approximately 30 per cent.

There are also indicators that Canadian health researchers and other scientists perform at a higher level than might have been expected for a country this size. A recent international ranking concluded that Canada's scientists outperform those of eight countries that spend more per capita on R&D. In an article by David A. King published in Nature in August 2004, Canada ranked sixth among 31 nations in top research papers (those that account for 98 per cent of the results most cited by other researchers). Yet Canada ranks 14th in research spending per capita among Western industrialized countries.

The importance of international involvement was recognized at the time of CIHR’s creation through specific mention in its founding legislation and reinforced in the CIHR Blueprint, which makes several statements on the need for CIHR and Canadian researchers to be engaged internationally. Both state that international relations support CIHR’s efforts to achieve the domestic components of its mandate as well as assisting Canada to meet the country’s responsibilities as a global citizen.

CIHR has been active internationally since its inception; between 2000 and 2005 Institutes developed 45 MOUs and many more international initiatives. In 2004/05 more than $38.5 million, or 5.6 per cent, of CIHR’s research spending went to international work and 12 per cent of training awards were for Canadians training in another country. International health-research leaders are interested in many innovations in health-research policy and practice introduced by CIHR, including our virtual institutes, extensive support for multi-disciplinary research, and development of the common CV.

Not surprisingly, this international involvement is leading to significantly more opportunities for international activities and collaborations as CIHR becomes more established and recognized. With these increasing opportunities comes the need to select wisely to ensure that CIHR and Canadian health research in general remain at the cutting-edge of science and continue to contribute to the health of Canadians and people throughout the world. Rather than react differently to each new opportunity, we have created this framework to establish priorities and to develop plans to achieve them. The framework is designed to provide coherence and guidance to make CIHR’s components as effective as possible in their international relations. It will be modified to reflect CIHR’s growing international experiences, Canadian government priorities and the changing international environment.

2.0 The Context for CIHR’s International Relations

2.1 Situational Analysis

CIHR’s international relations take place in a context of rapid change in international developments, the Canadian situation and health research. These factors create challenges and opportunities.

2.1.1 International Developments
Support for international health research has been spurred by experience with SARS, West Nile virus and avian flu, which have heightened concern about the global social and economic impacts of disease. In response, governments and international organizations are focusing on combating these and other health threats. Furthermore, three of the eight Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations are focused on health. This has mobilized international attention on the need to address health as an important development issue.

The United States plays a significant role in the world of health research and Canadian researchers benefit from that by developing collaborative research initiatives with many U.S. colleagues and through funding — Canada is the most successful nation competing for funds from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). CIHR operating grants with an international connection are overwhelmingly — about 90 per cent — with U.S. collaborators.

However, the research environment in the U.S. has not been without challenges. The dramatic rates of funding increases to NIH have slowed significantly and the post 9/11 environment in the U.S. has made that country less attractive as a location to train or conduct health research for many from other countries.

In other areas of the world, the European Commission (EC) is broadening contacts with researchers around the world and its 50-per-cent funding for the establishment of the European Research Area–Canada Science and Technology (ERA-CAN S&T) Office in Ottawa demonstrates the EC’s interest in strengthening research relations with us. Several other countries, including Japan, China, India and South Korea, have identified science and technology as key drivers of their economic development. These countries are making significant investments in research and are interested in building international collaborations. As Canada already has strong connections with several of these countries, it may have an advantage in the development of future research collaborations.

2.1.2 Canadian Situation
In recent years, there have been important federal investments in science and technology in Canada, including health research:

  • Creating CIHR;
  • Developing the Canada Foundation for Innovation to stimulate the renewal of research infrastructure;
  • Launching the Networks of Centres of Excellence program to stimulate the movement of innovative ideas from laboratories to the marketplace;
  • Creating Canada Research Chairs to attract and retain top academic talent; and
  • Supporting indirect costs of research.

The provinces have recognized the importance of knowledge development and application in the health sector by establishing or enhancing health-research funding organizations. Several of these organizations have also shown increasing interest in the international arena.

On the international front, the federal government continues to place primary attention on relations with the U.S., an emphasis underscored in recent policy statements which also emphasized the importance of developing relations with strong emerging economies such as India, China and Brazil. The first two of these countries are also the focus of Canada’s International Science and Technology Partnerships Program.

Canada’s publicly funded, single-payer health system continues to be well regarded around the world, which is good for Canadian international health initiatives. However, while our health system provides advantages for the management of clinical trials, it can slow the implementation of innovative products and treatments resulting from health research.

2.1.3 Health Research
The speed of discovery, the convergence of disparate fields and new countries producing groundbreaking research are combining to create a global revolution in health research. Canada is well positioned to excel during this time of rapid change due to our strength in leading-edge research in areas such as proteomic and nanotechnology, but we must ensure our researchers are well connected to both established and emerging centres of research excellence. At the same time, other countries, including the United Kingdom, have launched major initiatives to re-invigorate clinical health research. Canada has advantages on which to build excellent clinical research, including internationally recognized trialists, relatively low costs for conducting trials and the structure of the Canadian health system.

Finding highly qualified workers for health research is a struggle for many countries, partly because of the aging population, which is reducing the available workforce across all disciplines. Many high-income countries are looking internationally for skilled workers, which means there is strong competition to attract high-calibre health researchers and trainees. Unfortunately, international recruitment can cause shortages of skilled health personnel in poorer countries.

CIHR is recognized among international health research leaders as an innovative organization that has introduced novel approaches to health research such as our unique organizational model of virtual institutes, including distinctive institutes focused on Aboriginal Peoples’ Health and Gender and Health, our integrative and inclusive vision, and our problem-based approach with its emphasis on multi-disciplinarity.

2.2 Federal Government Directions

As a federal agency, CIHR must align itself with directions established by the federal government, such as those contained in foreign policy statements. It is also important that CIHR monitor policy directions established by federal bodies such as the National Science Advisor’s Office, Health Canada, Foreign Affairs Canada, International Trade Canada, Industry Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs to ensure our practices are in step with federal policy.

2.3 Global Health and CIHR’s International Relations

Global health issues are those affecting the low-income countries of the world and, more broadly, the health, health-system and health-policy challenges of disadvantaged populations. Low-income countries are an important component of Canada’s international relations. In health and health research these countries face significant challenges, often different than those faced by better-off nations. CIHR recognizes global health research as a major cross-cutting initiative. Together with the International Development Research Centre, the Canadian International Development Agency, and Health Canada, we are a founding partner of the Global Health Research Initiative and act as its secretariat. (Descriptions of GHRI partners’ roles in global health research can be found at the GHRI website.) CIHR’s own global health research activities also include involvement with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Challenge and the Canada-HOPE Scholarship Program.

2.4 Challenges and Opportunities

There are both challenges and opportunities in CIHR’s international work. Challenges include:

  • ensuring Canadian health researchers and organizations have an environment that stimulates and supports international collaboration;
  • making research contributions that protect Canadians from emerging health threats;
  • ensuring that Canada continues to have leading scientists who are globally connected to guide our health research;
  • establishing partnerships and finding resources to support a robust international program despite an increasingly strained budget for grants and operations;
  • selecting wisely from among the many opportunities for international partnership in order to obtain the greatest benefit for Canada: and,
  • establishing effective mechanisms for monitoring and taking advantage of major international developments in health research.

Opportunities include:

  • building on Canada’s good reputation for quality research, and the attractiveness of Canada as a country in which to work and study;
  • increasing the number of leading health researchers, especially from low and middle-income countries, who have trained in Canada and therefore have strong connections with the Canadian health research community;
  • enhancing relations with emerging global powers such as India and China by building on the already close connection between health researchers from Canada and colleagues in India and China; and,
  • sharing innovations that have make CIHR a leading health-research organization and learning from the experience of organizations in other countries.

3.0 International Strategic Priorities and Principles

CIHR’s strategic priorities and the principles underlying them are the core of this framework. Its purpose is to provide direction and guidance to ensure international collaborations focus on projects with the most impact for CIHR. The framework allows flexibility to respond to important opportunities, while protecting the interests and promoting the health of Canadians and people around the world. Any Institute or Branch contemplating an international project should review it using the priorities and principles below and decide whether to proceed based on that review and available budget.

Vision: CIHR is a global leader in health research as a result of pivotal contributions to the international advancement of health research and by making international involvement pervasive in its programming.

Mission: To lead, stimulate and facilitate effective Canadian involvement in international health research that benefits Canadians and the global community.

3.1 Strategic Priorities

This framework focuses on five priorities, which are described below. More details regarding activities planned for each priority can be found in Appendix A.

  1. Research - Priority A: Broker and stimulate productive and mutually beneficial health-research collaborations among Canadian researchers, institutions and firms and their international colleagues and counterparts.

    Research - Priority B: Contribute to and support CIHR’s international involvement in specific research subjects.

  2. Talent: Build programs for trainees and established health researchers to ensure Canada contributes to the development of health-research capacity both internationally and at home so scientists are internationally connected and competitive.

  3. Global Health: Address internationally recognized priorities in global health research.

  4. Safety and Security: Develop research initiatives to address emerging health threats to Canada and the global community.

  5. Organizational Best Practices: Lead the international exchange of best practices regarding health-research policies and management.

Using these priorities to assess projects will ensure CIHR identifies and acts on significant international opportunities that align with unique Canadian capabilities.

All of these priorities must be supported with:

  • Systems for gathering knowledge;
  • Participation in key national and international science and technology meetings; and
  • Strong relations with multilateral organizations including WHO, PAHO, the World Bank and other international stakeholders.

3.2 Principles for Selecting Opportunities

The principles for selecting international opportunities are based on CIHR’s experience with international activities, the CIHR’s ‘Guidelines for the Development of International Bilateral Relationships,’ conversations with CIHR staff and on the experience of other organizations. They can be used to evaluate possible international collaborations or for reviewing current international activities. Individual Institutes and Branches may wish to add other criteria that are particularly relevant to their situations and research communities. A frank review of all potential international collaborations against these criteria is crucial to ensure CIHR is using its limited resources in areas that will have maximum impact.

  1. Alignment with Institute and CIHR-wide mandate, values and priorities:
    • Will the initiative be conducted according to CIHR’s mandate and values, including internationally accepted research ethics?
    • Does the initiative support the priorities of CIHR, a specific Institute, or this framework?
  2. Alignment with Federal priorities:
    • Does the initiative comply with or reinforce relevant federal international priorities and policies?
  3. Consistency and synergy with CIHR’s and Canada’s strengths:
    • Does the initiative build on established areas of Canadian health-research expertise and strength?
    • Does the initiative build on existing CIHR activities and core competencies?
    • Does the initiative build on existing Canadian connections with a country, including initiatives of other Canadian organizations involved in research?
  4. Likelihood of success and impact:
    • What benefit does the initiative provide for Canadian health researchers and for Canada and what are the inherent risks?
    • Does the initiative identify specific objectives, concrete actions and quantifiable results to be achieved that are sustainable?
    • Does the initiative provide an opportunity to position Canada and CIHR positively on the international science and technology scene?
  5. Resource implications
    • What are the financial, human and other resources required to move the initiative forward effectively and efficiently, and does CIHR have those resources?
    • Does the initiative include the right people both at CIHR and at the international organization to ensure it is well co-ordinated by both sides?
    • Does the initiative include the right activities and events to make the best use of CIHR’s limited resources?

International projects must take into consideration cultural differences and ensure sufficient time is devoted to developing the relationship between the partners. Successful partnerships are grounded on a relationship of trust built over time. This can require several face-to-face meetings to build the trust necessary for success.

3.3 Priority Partner Countries

The process of responding to the questions included in the previous section should clarify whether a country is appropriate for an international collaboration. However, if questions remain, CIHR Institutes or Branches should place emphasis on the following countries as collaboration partners.

High income – U.S., Europe, Japan
U.S. researchers are by far the largest number of international partners funded by CIHR grants and the U.S. is a major source of grant support for Canadian health researchers. Many Institutes have relationships with the NIH. Together with its prominence in Canadian international policy, the U.S. is a top priority country.

The countries of the European Union and associate member states are another priority cluster. The European Union’s Seventh Research Framework Programme places significant emphasis on health research and many European countries have committed to substantial investments in S&T. There is a strong European desire for closer collaboration with Canada, shown by the European Union’s support for the European Research Area-Canada S&T office in Ottawa. It provides an excellent opportunity for building stronger links between Canadian scientists and their counterparts from European countries.

Japan is often identified as a target for enhanced economic relations and also as a crucial country to work with if an organization hopes to develop activities, as CIHR does, in the dynamic East Asian region. Since the signing of the Canada-Japan Science and Technology Agreement in 1986, the Japanese scientific community has demonstrated keen interest in closer collaboration with Canadian scientists. The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science continues to fund several Canadian scientists and trainees to participate in programs through which many Canadian researchers have gained access to top-class research facilities in Japan.

Middle income/emerging economies – India, China and Mexico
The Federal government has identified China and India as countries of focus for scientific and technological collaboration because of their emerging economic and research strength and long-standing relations many Canadian health researchers have with colleagues in those countries. Mexico is also a priority country for collaboration because of CIHR’s established work with that country, because of the North American Free Trade Agreement and because of the links through the Security and Prosperity Partnership.

Low income – We do not have priority low-income countries; rather, the following criteria can be used to identify appropriate countries with which to develop initiatives:

  • Population health status — are there health issues that would benefit from involvement with Canada?
  • The current health system and health research system — is it capable of benefiting from involvement with CIHR and Canadian researchers?
  • Emerging health threats (such as HIV and avian flu) — are there threats that affect the country in question, and potentially the entire globe, which Canadian health researchers might help mitigate or learn from in order to benefit Canada?
  • Political stability and the rule of law — Is the political situation stable enough for Canadian researchers to work safely and effectively?
  • Commitment to follow-through — Is there commitment to sustain the results of the partnership with CIHR?
  • Is there a history of relations with Canada (such as countries in the Commonwealth or la Francophonie) and/or prior technical assistance/health-research collaboration investments by Canada that justify a continued presence?

4.0 Operational Model: Roles and Responsibilities

Role of the Institutes and Corporate Office
Implementation responsibility for the actions related to this framework and for CIHR’s many international collaborations is dispersed throughout the organization. It is expected that most international partnerships will continue to be developed and implemented by Institutes, while taking into consideration the framework provided by this document. However, either Institutes or the Corporate Office can undertake actions aimed at achieving the identified priorities and in many cases more than one CIHR component may be involved.

Role of the International Relations Unit
The International Relations Unit provides support to Institutes and Branches for international projects, particularly at start up, and is also responsible co-ordinating and monitoring implementation of the framework, including developing a communications strategy. The International Relations Unit is also responsible for co-ordinating organization-wide initiatives and for gathering and distributing best practices and other tools of use in international work.

5.0 Outcomes and Evaluation

CIHR is committed to informing Canadians about all its initiatives and the results they deliver, and we will assess this framework through ongoing monitoring and periodic evaluation of selected indicators, such as those presented below, linked to the priorities and related outcomes.

Priorities Outputs and Outcomes Indicators
1. Research
  • Increased international collaboration by Canadian health researchers and institutions
  • Increased Canadian involvement in international clinical trials.
  • Continued or enhanced access for Canadian health researchers to leading-edge technology and thinking regarding health research
  • The number of CIHR grants that involve international collaborators.
  • The number of grants made through the IOP seed funding.
  • The dollar value of grants secured as the result of IOP projects.
  • The number of Canadian health research publications with a non-Canadian co-author.
  • The number of Canadians involved in non-Canadian peer review and international researchers involved in CIHR peer review.
  • The number of international IAB members.
  • The number of international clinical trials involving Canadians.
2. Talent
  • A Canadian health research community that is globally connected.
  • The number of training awards that involve a non-Canadian studying in Canada or Canadians studying in another country.
  • The number of STIHRs that have an international component
  • The number of Canadian researchers who have returned from training internationally.
3. Global Health
  • Recognition of Canada as a contributor to addressing significant global health challenges.
  • Health researchers in low and middle-income countries collaborating with Canadian colleagues.
  • The number of grants and awards made by the GHRI.
  • The existence of the Teasdale-Corti and the Grand Challenge Programs and the number of research linkages supported by them.
  • The number of countries involved in the Canada-HOPE Program and the number of scholarships provided.
4. Safety and Security
  • Research contributions to mitigate emerging health threats to Canadians and bio-terrorism.
  • The existence of a research component in Canadian government strategies aimed at combating health threats and bio-terrorism.
  • The existence and functioning of the Canadian Rapid Research Response Team.
5. Best Practices
  • Improved policies and systems for research management at CIHR.
  • CIHR contribution to improving the policies and systems for research management in research organizations in other countries.
  • International recognition of CIHR as a leading-edge health research organization.
  • The number of countries that have consulted CIHR regarding research management advances.
  • The number of instances in which research management advances from other countries have been adopted by CIHR.

6.0 Conclusion

This framework is designed to provide coherence and direction for planning CIHR’s international relations. CIHR’s Institutes and Branches can use it to assess international opportunities they might seek to develop or have to choose among. By attending to the priority areas identified and the related priority actions, CIHR will strengthen the benefits it produces for Canada while increasing its contributions around the world.

Appendix

Appendix A: Initiatives to Address the International Framework Priorities — Resource Requirements

The five priority areas are listed below with their related objectives and actions. The principal components of CIHR involved in each action are in brackets. Unless noted in italics at the end of the item, these actions can be implemented with existing financial resources but with additional staff time.

3.1 Research:
A) Broker and stimulate productive and mutually beneficial health research collaborations between Canadian researchers, institutions and firms and their international colleagues and counterpart organizations. The focus of these collaborations must be guided by Institute and CIHR -wide priorities.
Objectives Actions
Develop Funding and Support Mechanisms
  • Develop an International Collaboration Fund to improve opportunities for Canadian researchers to participate in research activities funded by non-Canadian agencies (Research and International Relations) New funds required
  • Confirm the meetings and proposal development component of the International Opportunity Program as an on-going program (Research and International Relations) Beyond the current year new funds will be required
  • Expand scientific exchange programs and manage existing ones (Research and International Relations) New funds required for expansion
  • Encourage and facilitate more Canadians to apply to international funding sources (Research, Institutes and International Relations)
Establish and Strengthen Networks, Linkages & Connections
  • Manage current MOUs and collaborations with target countries and, following review using the selection criteria, develop MOUs with key institutions in priority countries. (International Relations and Institutes) New funds required
  • Stimulate involvement with non-Canadian peer review, and international researchers' involvement with CIHR 's peer review (Research, Institutes and International Relations)
  • Develop guidelines for collaborating with NIH (Collaboration facilitated by International Relations)
  • Develop strategies to protect and enhance Canadian connections with the U.S. and NIH (International Relations, President's Office)
  • Stimulate, whenever appropriate, international involvement in existing CIHR programs (e.g., STIHRs, res. teams; open grants) (Research, Institutes and International Relations)
  • Stimulate and facilitate Canadian partnership in international multi-centre randomized control trials. (RCT Unit)
  • Build international representation on Institute IABs (Institutes and Governance Branch)
  • Expand the current tri-national program to accommodate other funding agencies and countries. (Research - RCT Unit and Institutes)
3.1 Research
B) Contribute to, and support CIHR 's international involvement in specific research subjects.
Objectives Actions
Support the international involvement of CIHR 's organization-wide, major strategic initiatives (currently regenerative medicine/nanotechnology and clinical research).
  • Ensure that the programs undertaken by these initiatives are open to international involvement (Institutes and Research - Cross-Cutting initiatives)
  • Seek collaborations in these research areas with non-Canadian, national health research bodies (Institutes and Research - Cross-cutting initiatives)
Support time-limited International health research activities (e.g. International Polar Year)
  • Build involvement with these activities into existing CIHR -wide and Institute programs (Research - Cross-Cutting Initiatives and Institutes)
  • Develop a plan for a range of CIHR involvement in these programs/activities (Research - Cross-Cutting initiatives)
3.2 Talent: Build programs for trainees and established health researchers to ensure Canada contributes to health research capacity development internationally and continues to have leading scientists who are globally connected and competitive.
Objectives Actions
Support international trainees to study in Canada and Canadian trainees to study in other countries.
  • Develop quality training programs to bring leading trainees to Canada, where clearly appropriate for training purposes, and re-establish them in their own country following the training (Research - RCD and RTP and International Relations) New funds required
  • Facilitate Canadians training abroad to re-enter Canadian positions (re-entry year and other activities) (Research - RCD and International Relations) New funds required
  • Encourage and develop mechanisms, in collaboration with the primary health research organizations of other agencies, to support the international mobility of trainees (Research - RCD and International Relations) New funds required
  • Encourage STIHRs to involve trainees from other countries and to have Canadians conduct some of their training internationally. (Research, Institutes) New funds required
  • Stimulate Canadian trainees to do a period of their training internationally (Institutes and Research - RCD)
Encourage established Canadian researchers to return to Canada.
  • Create, in collaboration with CFI and the Canada Research Chairs program, a program of establishment grants to assist, in their first year or two, international researchers who are hired to work in Canada. (Research and International Relations) New funds required
3.3 Global Health: Address internationally-recognized priorities in global health research.
Objectives Actions
Develop training programs to build research capacity in low income countries.
  • Expand the Canada-HOPE Scholarship Program (Research - RTP and International Relations) New funds required.
  • Operate the existing Canada-HOPE Scholarship Program (Research - RTP and International Relations)
Support research aimed at addressing crucial needs of low income countries.
  • Maintain and strengthen GHRI - (IPPH)
  • Operate the Gates Grand Challenges (Research and International Relations
Support the development of research organizational capacity in low income countries.
  • Research organizational development - assisting health research organizations in low income countries to become more effective (Research, GHRI and International Relations) New funds required
3.4 Safety and Security: Develop research initiatives to address emerging health threats to Canada and the global community.
Objectives Actions
Develop research strategies to address disease threats
  • Implementation of the Canadian Rapid Research Response Team (III) New funds required .
  • Develop research strategies to anticipate and respond to the probable avian flu pandemic (III) New funds required
  • Build links with related Canadian federal departments (III and International Relations)
Develop research strategies to contribute to the response to bio-terrorism, and to increase the health-related aspects of domestic security
  • Develop research strategies (III) New funds required.
    • U.S. and Mexico - Security and Prosperity Partnership
    • Dual use of bio-technology
  • Build links with related Canadian federal departments (III and International Relations)
3.5 Organizational Best Practices: Lead the international exchange of best practices regarding health research policies and management.
Objectives Actions
Support the development of networks among human resources in national health research organizations.
  • Build connections between subject matter leaders (eg. technology transfer; IT) of national health-research organizations (Research, ITMS and Ethics)
Encourage the exchange of research management and policy advances.
  • Support research organization development by exchanging personnel and research management information with non-Canadian research organizations (Research- RPP , ITMS , Ethics) New funds required
  • Continue to develop international policies regarding registration of RCTs (Research - RCT Unit)
  • Extend awareness of the Common CV (Research- RPP)
  • Science to Business - Build awareness of this new educational program (Research- RTP)