CIHR-PHAC Hepatitis C Research Initiative Strategic Review - Long Descriptions

Figure 1 – Number of respondents by primary job title

Twenty-four respondents participated in the survey, and indicated their primary job title.

  • Professor: 4
  • Professor of Medicine: 3
  • Assistant Professor: 2
  • Associate Professor: 2
  • Hepatitis C Researcher: 2
  • Clinical Researcher: 1
  • Director: 1
  • Director Hepatitis Services: 1
  • Hepatitis C Ttreatment Nurse: 1
  • Hepatologist: 1
  • Manager – Hepatitis C Program: 1
  • Physician Epidemiologist: 1
  • Professor of Immunology: 1
  • Psychologist: 1
  • Scientist: 1
  • Medical Doctor: 1

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Figure 2 – Number of respondents by primary institution/organization

  • BC Centre for Disease Control – University of British Columbia: 3
  • University of Alberta: 3
  • Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM): 3
  • Memorial University of Newfoundland: 2
  • South Riverdale Community Health Centre (Toronto): 2
  • University of Calgary: 2
  • The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa: 2
  • CATIE: 1
  • CHU Sainte-Justine: 1
  • Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS): 1
  • Institute for Clinical Evaluative Science: 1
  • Université de Montréal: 1
  • University Health Network – University of Toronto: 1
  • University of Manitoba: 1

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Figure 3 – Number of respondents by Province/Territory

  • Ontario: 7
  • Quebec: 6
  • Alberta: 5
  • British Columbia: 3
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 2
  • Manitoba: 1

0 respondents from: New Brunswick, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan and Yukon.

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Figure 4 – Number of respondents who have received funding from the CIHR-PHAC Hepatitis C Research Initiative

  • Yes: 12
  • No: 12

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Figure 5 – Number of respondents by area of research/practice

Respondents were able to choose multiple options, as applicable.

  • Biology: 13
  • Therapeutic Research: 13
  • Clinical Treatment/Delivery of Care: 11
  • Quality of Life: 8
  • Prevention: 6
  • Epidemiology: 5
  • Other*: 4

*Other:

  1. HIV Treatment in HCV coinfection
  2. Vaccines
  3. Vaccine antiviral therapy
  4. Antiviral drugs

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Figure 6 – Number of respondents by all of the knowledge translation activities they engage in

  • Dissemination and public outreach: 21
  • Synthesis: 17
  • Knowledge Exchange: 16
  • Apply knowledge in an ethically sound way: 8

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Figure 7 – Number of respondents by methods used in the past or currently in use to disseminate and/or translate the knowledge generated from Hepatitis C research at the end of a study

Respondents chose all applicable options.

  • Presentations and abstracts: 23
  • Research papers: 22
  • Posters: 20
  • Invited lectures: 20
  • Linking to/participating in knowledge networks: 13
  • Developing other academic curricula: 12
  • Engaging in communities of practice: 11
  • Developing e-learning modules: 7
  • Registered patents/intellectual property: 5
  • Webinars: 5
  • Other*: 5
  • Live chats: 3
  • Blog or blog posts: 2
  • Live online broadcasts (e.g. YouTube, UStream, LiveStream): 2

Podcasts: 0

* Other:
  • Education initiatives
  • Creation of spin-off related to HCV research
  • Publications (fact sheets, practical guides, websites
  • Social media/social networking
  • "Just started this year" - to be determined

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Figure 8 – Number of respondents by knowledge translation methods used in the past or currently to include the intended users of the Hepatitis C research or those that could be affected by the research throughout the research process

Respondents chose all applicable options.

  • Collaboratively generating research questions (with the researchers and the community): 19
  • Returning data to the community (via meetings and/or opportunities for reflection and feedback): 15
  • Gathering and analyzing data (including training, collaborative collection and analysis, translation into narratives, etc.): 13
  • Negotiating purpose and objectives of research with the community and defining how the research process will unfold: 8
  • Prioritizing challenges, coordinating resources and developing joint plans for action between researchers and the community: 4

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Figure 9 – Number of respondents who consider the commercial potential for their Hepatitis C research

  • Yes: 9
  • No: 12
  • Not sure: 2

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Figure 10 – Number of respondents who see value in considering the commercial potential for their Hepatitis C research

  • Yes: 13
  • No: 5
  • Not sure: 5

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Figure 11 – Number of respondents who have participated in the CIHR Summer Institute

  • Yes: 2
  • No: 14
  • Didn't know about it: 7

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Figure 12 – Number of respondents who have applied for a CIHR Knowledge Translation award

  • Yes: 9
  • No: 13
  • Didn't know about it: 1

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Figure 13 – Number of respondents who have participated in a CIHR Café Scientifique

  • Yes: 5
  • No: 15
  • Didn't know about it: 3

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Figure 14 – Number of respondents whose research activities related to Hepatitis C involve any of the following:

  • Partnerships with one or more organizations: 18
  • Inter- or multi-disciplinary collaboration with other health topics: 18
  • Inter-agency collaboration (NSERC, SSHRC): 3

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