ARCHIVED - CIHR Three-Year Implementation Plan and Progress Report 2011–14

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Health Research Roadmap: Creating innovative research for better health and health care

Table of Contents

President’s Message

About CIHR

  1. Invest in World-Class Research
  2. Address Health and Heath System Research Priorities
  3. Accelerate the Capture of Health and Economic Benefits of Health Research
  4. Achieve Organizational Excellence, Foster Ethics and Demonstrate Impact

Footnotes


President's Message

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) celebrated its 10th anniversary this past fiscal year by working hard towards meeting objectives outlined in our strategic plan, Health Research Roadmap. It has been a year of change, progress and challenges. Throughout this period of transition, we began to deliver on many of the commitments articulated in Roadmap.

The prestigious new Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships program, launched with our partners the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), completes an important missing piece for the Government of Canada’s training/salary support programs. With the Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships, Canada can now offer the full spectrum of support from graduate to postgraduate studies and beyond. We can expect the program to attract and retain top-tier postdoctoral talent nationally and internationally.

This year also saw the launch of a new process for directing investments towards the five strategic research priorities identified in Roadmap. We initiated a rigorous business planning process to identify needs and opportunities where additional research investment could make a difference. We have since identified eight Roadmap signature initiatives for future development, including the Canadian Epigenetics, Environment and Health Research Consortium; Community-Based Primary Health Care; and Inflammation in Chronic Disease. These initiatives will represent a pan-institute approach to strategic research and will help CIHR allocate its resources to make the strongest possible impact on health and health care.

As part of our ongoing efforts to improve organizational excellence, CIHR also participated in a second International Review of the organization. The review was conducted by an International Review Panel chaired by Dr. Elias Zerhouni, former Director of the US National Institutes of Health. The outcome of the review will provide an assessment of how effectively CIHR is fulfilling its mandate and of what we can do to improve.

When we originally drafted Roadmap, stakeholders described the plan as overambitious. I would freely acknowledge the truth of that sentiment; however, such a plan was absolutely necessary to achieve a strong new vision for health research in Canada. Two years after launching Roadmap, we are on course and we will continue to assess our progress as we move forward.

Alain Beaudet, MD, PhD
President
Canadian Institutes of Health Research


About CIHR

Mandate

The mandate of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is to “excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system” (Bill C-13, April 13, 2000).

Vision

CIHR’s vision is to position Canada as a world leader in the creation and use of health research knowledge that benefits Canadians and the global community.

Achieving the mandate and vision

Established in 2000, CIHR promotes a solutions-focused, multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health research. Its unique structure brings together researchers from across disciplinary and geographic boundaries through its 13 Institutes. As of June 2011, CIHR supports over 14,100 health researchers and trainees in universities, teaching hospitals and other health organizations and research centres across the country. The agency supports health research through a transparent process that meets the highest international standards of excellence and ethics in four research areas: biomedical; clinical; health systems and services; and the social, cultural and environmental factors that affect the health of populations.

Institutes

CIHR’s 13 Institutes share responsibility for achieving the fundamental objective of CIHR and have their own distinct strategic plans that are aligned with the overarching directions, mandate and vision of CIHR. The Institutes promote and build upon Canada’s firm foundation of research excellence, engage the research community and encourage interdisciplinary, integrative health research and knowledge translation. Through their Scientific Directors and Institute Advisory Boards and under the oversight and guidance of CIHR’s Governing Council, the Institutes work with stakeholders to forge a health research agenda across disciplines, sectors and regions that embraces scientific opportunity and reflects the emerging health needs of Canadians, the evolution of the health care system and the information needs of health policy decision makers.

CIHR’s 13 Institutes

What’s new

New to the Three-Year Implementation Plan and Progress Report 2011-14 is performance information for each of the strategic directions. Results achieved will now include baseline data from 2009-10 (where available) and current data from 2010-11. This will allow CIHR to report on the actual progress made towards implementing the strategic plan, as well as measure the success of the Roadmap reforms. The performance indicators and data will continue to be refined in the coming years.

Legend
Checkmark denotes the action was completed in 2010-2011

= Completed

Diagonal-lined fill denotes CIHR's extended timeline to complete this action

= Extended timeline

1. Invest in World-Class Research

Goal 1: Train, retain and sustain outstanding health researchers

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Attract and retain the best health research trainees Conduct a scan of CIHR support for trainees Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2011-2012
Design and implement reforms to enhance CIHR support for trainees Continued in 2010-2012 and extended to 2012-2013
Attract and retain the best postdoctoral fellows Implement the prestigious Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships program announced in Budget 2010 Completed in 2010-2011
Increase funding for postdoctoral fellowships Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2012-2013
Attract and retain the best early career researchers Design and implement reforms to enhance support for early career researchers Continued in 2010-2012 and extended to 2012-2013
Break down professional and sectoral barriers in health research and prepare young researchers for various labour markets Harmonize Vanier scholarships program delivery with NSERC and SSHRC Completed in 2010-2011
Design new programs to foster multidisciplinary training Beginning in 2011-2012 and to be completed in 2013-2014

Section 1 - Goal 1: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Attract and retain the best health research trainees Number and type of trainees directly supported by CIHR 3,055 3,049 Data available in future
Attract and retain the best postdoctoral fellows Number of postdoctoral fellows directly supported by CIHR 737 736 Data available in future
Attract and retain the best early career researchers Number of early career researchers directly supported by CIHR1 1,261 1,170 Data available in future

Goal 2: Select and sustain research excellence

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Strengthen peer review Establish a college of reviewers Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2012-2013
Develop and implement a training and evaluation process for peer reviewers Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2012-2013
Make enhancements to peer review processes Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2012-2013
Improve funding mechanisms to support health research Assess current suite of funding mechanisms and identify best international practices Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012
Design and implement reforms to research funding mechanisms ensuring an appropriate balance between sustainability and creativity Continued in 2010-2013 and extended to 2013-2014

Section 1 - Goal 2: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Strengthen peer review Number of peer reviewers2 2,553 2,718 Data available in future
Number of peer reviewers trained N/A N/A Data available in future
Estimated number of peer review work days per reviewer N/A N/A Data available in future
Improve funding mechanisms to support health research CIHR investment in open research $540.1M $547.1M Data available in future
Number of researchers supported in open research programs 6,010 6,297 Data available in future
Excellence of research supported: average relative citation factor (ARC)3 1.33 Data available in future
Excellence of research supported: average relative impact factor (ARIF)4 1.54 Data available in future

Goal 3: Promote interdisciplinary and international innovation

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Attract and retain the best international scholars and experts to Canada Review and reform funding programs to attract and retain international researchers Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Increase number of international partners investing with CIHR Develop and implement a new CIHR international strategy Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012
Foster key international partnerships Continued in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014
Lead the development of international health research consortia Continued in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014
Facilitate health research capacity building in low- and middle-income countries Develop and implement a global health research strategy Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013

Section 1 - Goal 3: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Attract and retain the best international scholars and experts to Canada Number of international researchers recruited to Canada5 31 32 Data available in future
Increase number of international partners investing with CIHR Number of active international partnership agreements6 39 45 Data available in future
CIHR investment in international programs $17.1M $22.4M Data available in future
Leveraged partner contributions through international and global health agreements7 $50.4M $57.7M Data available in future
Facilitate health research capacity building in low- and middle-income countries CIHR investments in building research capacity in low- and middle-income countries N/A Data available in future

2. Address Health and Health System Research Priorities

Goal 1: Improve focus, coherence and impact from CIHR’s strategic investments

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Establish a comprehensive process for selecting strategic priorities Develop and implement a new strategic investment planning process Completed in 2010-2011
Develop and implement a program design framework Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2011-2012
Identify and launch strategic initiatives with clear and measurable objectives that are aligned to strategic priorities and designed to achieve the desired impact Identify and launch strategic initiatives Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2013-2014
Monitor and evaluate strategic initiatives Begun in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014

Section 2 - Goal 1: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Identify and launch strategic initiatives with clear and measurable objectives that are aligned to strategic priorities and designed to achieve the desired impact CIHR investment in strategic initiative research $268.1M $287.9M Data available in future
Number of strategic funding opportunities launched9 117 96 Data available in future
Number of new Roadmap signature initiatives that were approved 1 4 Data available in future

Goal 2: Build strategies and initiatives that address health and health system priorities

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
CIHR will focus its activities on the following five broad priorities:
  • Enhance patient-oriented care and improve clinical results
  • Support a high-quality, accessible and sustainable health care system
  • Reduce health inequities of Aboriginal peoples and other vulnerable populations
  • Prepare for and respond to existing and emerging threats to health
  • Promote health and reduce the burden of chronic disease and mental illness
In collaboration with partners, researchers and other key stakeholders, develop strategies to address specific priorities that identify key gaps and opportunities and propose solutions Continued in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014
Launch strategic initiatives to advance knowledge, build capacity and translate knowledge for the benefit of Canadians Continued in 2010-2013 and extended to 2013-2014
Use CIHR's convening power to engage decision makers and experts on issues of concern to health researchers, institutions, health providers, public policy makers and citizens Continued in 2010-2013 and extended to 2013-2014

Section 2 - Goal 2: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Enhance patient-oriented care and improve clinical results
Support a high-quality, accessible and sustainable health care system
Reduce health inequities of Aboriginal peoples and other vulnerable populations
Prepare for and respond to existing emerging threats to health
Promote health and reduce the burden of chronic disease and mental illness

3. Accelerate the Capture of Health and Economic Benefits of Health Research

Goal 1: Reap the socioeconomic benefits from research through KT and partnerships

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Facilitate and strengthen partnerships between researchers and knowledge users and between CIHR and a variety of organizations to achieve impact Assess the current suite of integrated knowledge translation funding mechanisms to identify best practices and design and implement improvements as appropriate Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Implement improved partnership practices Continued in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014
Support evidence-informed policy making to improve health and the health system at the provincial, territorial and federal levels Implement and deliver programs to support evidence-informed policy making and increase policy makers' access to high-quality evidence Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012
Facilitate innovation and commercialization by creating incentives for health researcher and private sector partners to work together to translate health research findings into improved health products, technologies and tools for Canadians Assess current funding mechanisms and design and implement improvements, as appropriate, to reflect the changing commercialization environment Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Increase citizen engagement and public outreach initiatives Develop and implement tools and resources to increase external participation and uptake in citizen engagement activities Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012
Develop and implement communication and engagement strategies to elevate CIHR's profile nationally and internationally Completed in 2010-2011

Section 3 - Goal 1: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Partnerships
Evidence-informed policy making
Commercialization
Citizen engagement and public outreach
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Facilitate and strengthen partnerships between researchers and knowledge users and between CIHR and a variety of organizations to achieve impact Number of partners10 277 279 Data available in future
Leveraged partner contributions11 $74.6M $78.9M Data available in future
Facilitate innovation and commercialization by creating incentives for health researchers and private sector partners to work together to translate health research findings into improved health products, technologies and tools for Canadians CIHR investments in commercialization programs12 $21.9M $22.6M Data available in future
Increase citizen engagement and public outreach initiatives Number of media citations (in both official languages) 4,041 5,682 Data available in future
Number of visitors to the CIHR website13 1.0M 1.0M Data available in future

Goal 2: Enhance the application of research and its evaluation

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Advance the application of research and its evaluation Develop and implement KT innovations to move knowledge into action Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2011-2012
Build capacity of both researchers and knowledge users to engage in KT Promote and support effective dissemination and exchange of research findings from CIHR investments with relevant knowledge users Continued in 2010-2011 and ongoing through 2013-2014
Develop and implement guides and tools to support end of grant KT and integrated KT for applicants and reviewers Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012
Increase the number of researchers advancing the science of KT Launch new funding mechanisms that support KT science and build KT capacity Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013

Section 3 - Goal 2: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Advance the application of research and its evaluation CIHR expenditures in KT programs14 $21.9M $32.2M Data available in future
Build capacity of both researchers and knowledge users to engage in KT Number of CIHR-funded researchers and trainees involved in KT research15 1,581 2,113 Data available in future
Increase the number of researchers advancing the science of KT Number of KT grants awarded 450 653 Data available in future

4. Achieve Organizational Excellence, Foster Ethics and Demonstrate Impact

Goal 1: Advance organizational excellence and ensure transparency and accountability

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Develop state-of-the-art human resource management practices across the organization Implement human resources strategy and action plans Completed in 2010-2011
Apply technology-based solutions across the organization Develop and implement a three-year information-technology plan Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Design and implement an architecture framework (technology, information, business process) aimed at aligning services Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2012-2013
Develop and implement a health researcher database Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012

Section 4 - Goal 1: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Develop state-of-the-art human resource management practices across the organization Time to process individual performance awards (days) 21 25 Data available in future
Average number of paid sick days per user 8.56 7.48 Data available in future
Average number of training days per person 3.31 3.48 Data available in future
Apply technology-based solutions across the organization Availability of CIHR's key systems (ResearchNET) N/A Data available in future

Goal 2: Evaluate the overall success of CIHR

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Ensure relevancy and effectiveness of CIHR programs Implement a CIHR five-year evaluation plan Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2013-2014
Complete CIHR's second International Review Completed in 2010-2011
Develop and implement strategies responding to recommendations made in CIHR's second International Review Report Beginning in 2011-2012 and extended to 2012-2013

Section 4 - Goal 2: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Ensure relevancy and effectiveness of CIHR programs Number of corporate evaluations completed N/A 2 Data available in future
Percentage of 2011 International Review recommendations addressed N/A Data available in future

Goal 3: Foster a culture of ethical research by promoting and assisting the discussion and application of ethical principles to health research

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Be nationally respected and internationally acknowledged for CIHR's role in the creation of health ethics knowledge and in its continuous translation into the highest standards of ethics and integrity in health research, policy and practice Develop and implement a health research ethics strategy Continued in 2010-2012 and extended to 2013-2014
Enhance funding mechanisms to support the creation and foster the use of knowledge in health ethics Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Develop and implement policies and guidelines to promote the ethical conduct of Canadian health researchers and institutions supported by CIHR Continued in 2010-2011 and extended to 2013-2014

Section 4 - Goal 3: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Be nationally respected and internationally acknowledged for CIHR's role in the creation of health ethics knowledge and in its continuous translation into the highest standards of ethics and integrity in health research, policy and practice Number of CIHR-funded researchers and trainees involved in ethics research16 223 251 Data available in future
CIHR expenditures in ethics research17 $1.4M $1.2M Data available in future

Goal 4: Assess progress and impact by demonstrating the impacts of CIHR investments

Five-Year Objectives Actions 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Build conceptual and technical infrastructure to track and demonstrate the impacts of health research and CIHR investments Implement changes to requests for applications process to ensure clear objectives and performance measures are established Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Develop and implement corporate-wide research classification system Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Implement the CIHR Impact Assessment Framework through the completion of specific studies Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2012-2013
Implement the Research Reporting System Continued in 2010-2011 and to be completed in 2011-2012

Section 4 - Goal 4: Table long description

2010-11 Highlights of Results Achieved
Five-Year Objectives Performance Measures Baseline (2009-10) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Build conceptual and technical infrastructure to track and demonstrate the impacts of health research and CIHR investments Number of Research Reporting System end-of-grant reports received N/A Data available in future

Footnotes

  1. An early career researcher is defined as a recipient of a CIHR new investigator salary award or a first-time grant awardee (nominated principal investigator) whose last degree ended five years or less before the original competition date.
  2. The number of peer reviewers refers to the discrete number of reviewers and not the number of peer review occurrences as reported in the Departmental Performance Report.
  3. Baseline ARC and ARIF ratings were calculated by CIHR’s Evaluation Unit using bibliometric data for the Open Operating Grant Program (2000–09) from L’Observatoire des sciences et des technologies in 2010.
  4. Baseline ARC and ARIF ratings were calculated by CIHR’s Evaluation Unit using bibliometric data for the Open Operating Grant Program (2000–09) from L’Observatoire des sciences et des technologies in 2010.
  5. Count only includes international researchers recruited by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships program, Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships program and Canada Research Chairs program.
  6. Includes various types of agreements (with or without funding associated). Renewals are not counted separately.
  7. Leveraged partner contributions through international and global health agreements include national and international partner contributions. International partner contributions are not administered by CIHR; the partners pay their researchers directly. Partner contributions are estimates due to variances in currency conversion and other reasons.
  8. There are three other signature initiatives under development: Pathways to Health Equity for Aboriginal Peoples; the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research; and the International Collaborative Research Strategy on Alzheimer's Disease.
  9. Totals for strategic initiative funding opportunities exclude priority announcements.
  10. This count only includes partners with a formal agreement with CIHR. Agreements may have a cash research contribution, in-kind contribution or operational budget amount.
  11. Total leveraged partner contributions are estimates and include financial contributions from partners in the voluntary and private sectors as well as provincial health research funders that may or may not be administered by CIHR. Partner contributions as measured here do not include in-kind partner contributions and may not include all partner funds not administered by CIHR (i.e. international).
  12. This count includes programs from the suite of commercialization programs as well as programs designed to advance the commercialization of health research, including industry-partnered programs.
  13. Baseline data for CIHR web performance metrics starts from 2010-11. Researchers, parliamentarians and the media make up approximately 22% of the overall audience that can be identified.
  14. KT programs include specific programs in the suite of Core KT Programs as well as programs related to KT in the Core Open Operating Grant Program.
  15. KT programs include specific programs in the suite of Core KT Programs as well as programs related to KT in the Core Open Operating Grant Program.
  16. This count only includes programs launched by CIHR’s Ethics Office.
  17. This count only includes programs launched by CIHR’s Ethics Office.
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