Backgrounder - The Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies

Press Release 2011-32 ]

The Government of Canada has committed $17.5 million over five years to support the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), a new resource that brings together more than 60 researchers in a network of collaborating centres to conduct independent research on the safety and effectiveness of drugs approved for sale in Canada.

The objectives of the CNODES include:

  • Addressing drug safety and effectiveness research through collaboration among regional centres using centrally developed research protocols
  • Building capacity in drug safety and effectiveness research by actively engaging trainees, new investigators and researchers from complementary disciplines
  • Fostering improved sharing of information between researchers and end-users (including provincial policymakers)

Canada holds a rich resource in administrative health data, largely residing in provinces and territories. The CNODES offers an opportunity to coordinate access to these autonomous data resources and synergize their utility in answering significant research questions for the health of Canadians.

CNODES is being funded through the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) initiative. DSEN has been established at Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in partnership with Health Canada as part of the Government of Canada's Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP).

The DSEN is linking centres across Canada on two primary research directions of drug safety and comparative effectiveness. The overarching idea behind DSEN is to bring investigators and end-users together so that post-market drug research addresses identified knowledge gaps.

DSEN complements Canada's rigorous pre-testing of new drugs by studying how Canadians respond over time to already approved drugs. This initiative, which was announced by Minister Aglukkaq in January 2009, represents a federal investment of $32 million over the first five years and $10 million per year thereafter in the safety and effectiveness of drugs for Canadians.