Young Investigators Forum Report 2012

Table of Contents


Executive Summary

The YI forum was a major training and educational initiative aimed at bringing young investigators from the Institute's focus areas together to interact with one another, to learn about upcoming CIHR initiatives, and to attend workshops important for career development and related skills.

In his keynote address, Dr. Alain Moreau, Université de Montréal, provided an appraisal of the need for balance between personal life and academic achievements, and the importance of awareness of the multi-dimensional aspects of health research.

Six young investigators presented their research findings with each presentation focusing on one of IMHA's six focus areas. Dr. Heinrike Schmeling presented findings of research on drug therapies for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Dr. Christine B. Novak reported on the biomedical and psychosocial factors associated with disability after peripheral nerve injury. Dr. Faleh Tamimi discussed the cholinergic regulation of bone. Dr. Stephen Brown presented on experimentally-induced disc degeneration and its impact on muscle. Dr. Jeff Biernaskie reported on the role of dermal stem cells in skin and hair follicle regeneration. Finally, Dr. Maryam Amin discussed research on the perceived and normative dental health status of African immigrants' children.

Dr. Jane E. Aubin, Chief Scientific Officer at CIHR, presented on Signature Initiatives as well as open and peer review reforms. The presentation summarized CIHR's Roadmap Signature Initiatives and informed the young investigators of the upcoming changes to CIHR programs and the peer-review process.

The biomedical CIHR Grant Writing workshop was hosted by Dr. Jeff Dixon and Dr. Stephen Sims (University of Western Ontario, and Western University, respectively). The Clinical/Health Services/Population Health research grant writing workshop was hosted by Dr. Gillian Hawker, University of Toronto. The workshops provided a discussion of the grant writing process and provided useful guidelines for future grant applications.

The biomedical Managing Your Time and Research Team workshop was hosted Dr. Marc Pouliot, Laval University. The Clinical/Health Services/Population Health Managing Your Time and Research was hosted by Dr. John M. Esdaile, University of British Columbia. The workshops aimed to help new investigators make informed and deliberate decisions about setting the foundation for their research careers to better manage their time.

Two Interactive Mock Peer-review Panel sessions were held, one entailing a review of a CIHR biomedical grant application, and the second a review of a Clinical/Health Services/Population Health grant application. Principal Investigators were unidentified in both cases. The sessions provided an "inside look" at the peer review process and gave the young investigators the opportunity to act as members of the panel, to interact with and observe the grant peer review panel, and to score the grant under review.

Dr. Alain Moreau hosted the workshop entitled "What is Translational Research and Why is it Important". The goal of the workshop was to help young investigators better understand the importance and relevance of knowledge translation (KT) in Canadian health research. The workshop also provided guidelines on how to integrate KT into research projects.

Dr. Monique Gignac, University of Toronto, hosted the workshop entitled: "Effective Presentations and Public Speaking". The workshop provided tips and guidelines to improve presentations to the public, with an emphasis on research presentations.

Dr. Joy MacDermid, McMaster University, hosted the workshop entitled: "Top Five Things to Do to Write Great Papers". The workshop provided tips and guidelines for writing excellent scientific articles.

At the poster session, each young investigator presented a poster outlining the findings of their recent research. The session provided forum participants the opportunity to network and interact with other young researchers while learning about their research.

Background

The CIHR Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis (IMHA) supports research to enhance active living, mobility and movement, and musculoskeletal, skin and oral health. More specifically, it supports research that addresses causes, prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, support needs and palliation for a wide range of diseases and conditions related to the Institute's six foci: arthritis, bone, skin, muscle, musculoskeletal (MSK) rehabilitation, and oral health. IMHA's six mandated foci are all linked to chronic disease, and collectively constitute a frequent cause of long-term disability. Despite obvious inter-relationships among components of the MSK system and connective tissues generally in health and disease, not all of the associated research communities in IMHA's six foci work together. IMHA aims to continue bringing its research community together around three cross-cutting strategic priorities: Tissue Injury, Repair and Replacement; Pain, Disability and Chronic Disease; and Physical Activity, Mobility and Health. As indicated by data collected by IMHA for the last CIHR international review, the Institute has built capacity and advanced the translation of new knowledge with measurable outputs and impacts in all six foci. IMHA continues to support cross-focus multidisciplinary research and activities aimed at tackling research questions within the Institute's broad mandate.The Young Investigators (YI) forum was a major initiative to convene young researchers from all of our focus areas.

Conference Overview

The YI forum was the first time IMHA convened young investigators from all of its research foci at the same time and place. The YI forum was a major training and educational initiative aimed at bringing young investigators (defined as researchers holding a professorship with less than 5 years of experience) from all the Institute's focus areas together to interact with one another, to learn about upcoming CIHR initiatives, and to attend workshops important for career development and related skills. The forum offered young investigators in the research areas of arthritis, skin, muscle, bone, MSK rehabilitation, and oral health tools to better prepare for and enhance success in CIHR grant competitions, with the overall goal of providing them a 'home' in the IMHA research community. Eighty young investigators from across Canada participated in the forum and took part in a poster session where they each presented findings from their scientific research. The forum activities were held on June 11 and 12 at the Kingbridge Conference Centre Institute, a short distance north of Toronto (King City).

Day 1 – Welcoming Remarks

The first day of the YI forum officially began with an address by IMHA's Interim Scientific Director Dr. Phillip Gardiner. Dr. Gardiner is Director of the Health, Leisure & Human Performance Research Institute, and holds professorial positions in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management (as Associate Dean, Research), and in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, at the University of Manitoba. After introducing himself to the participants and thanking them for attending, Dr. Gardiner noted that IMHA's mandate covers a wide range of diseases and conditions, and the importance of young investigators for the future of Canadian research in these areas. Dr. Gardiner noted that one purpose of the forum was to prepare young investigators and emphasized a need for readiness both to accommodate and adapt to changes in the Canadian health research landscape. Further, an additional objective of the forum was to inform participants of upcoming changes at CIHR, as well of future funding opportunities such as the planned CIHR Signature Initiatives. The forum conference program was summarized and the names of the speakers announced. Dr. Gardiner finished his opening address by highlighting the importance of increased collaboration among researchers working in the Institute's six different focus areas, with a main objective of the conference therefore being the promotion of interaction and networking among the young investigators and the establishment of potentially long-lasting relationships. The keynote speaker, Dr. Alain Moreau, was then introduced and welcomed to the podium.


IMHA's Interim Scientific Director Dr. Phillip Gardiner during his welcoming remarks.

Keynote Address

Dr. Alain Moreau's keynote address was entitled "Tips for a successful career in research". Dr. Alain Moreau is a Professor in the Faculty of Dentistry (Stomatology Department), cross-appointed to the Biochemistry Department in the Faculty of Medicine at the Université de Montréal. He is the Assistant Director - Academic Affairs of Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Centre and Co-director of the Dentistry Department (and the Vice Chair of the IMHA IAB). His keynote address aimed to provide inspiration to the young investigators and both acknowledged and addressed the many questions often asked when beginning a career in health research. Topics discussed included phenotypes of successful researchers, political awareness, mentorship, performance measurement, and academic promotions. Overall, the presentation provided a realistic appraisal of the need for balance between personal life and academic achievements, and the importance of awareness of the multi-dimensional aspects of health research. The floor was then open for questions.

Day 1 - Forum Presentations

IMHA-Relevant Young Investigator Research – A Brighter Future

The YI presentations were chaired and introduced by Dr. Marc Pouliot. Dr. Pouliot is a professor in the Department of Microbiology-Infectiology & Immunology at Laval University. Prior to the forum, all young investigators submitted abstracts for the poster sessions. These were reviewed by the forum planning committee and six abstracts were selected, each within one of IMHA's six focus areas, for presentation at the forum.


The main conference room where participants gathered for many of the presentations.

Arthritis

Dr. Heinrike Schmeling's presentation was related to IMHA's arthritis focus area, and was entitled: "No benefit of the combination therapy Etanercept and Methotrexate compared to Etanerceptmonotherapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis – a matched pair analysis". Dr. Schmeling is an Assistant Professor and Clinician Scientist in the Department of Pediatrics, Section of Rheumatology at the University of Calgary. Dr. Schmeling presented the findings of a study examining the effects of different therapies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the most common inflammatory disease in childhood. The conventional treatment alone for this disease was compared to the effectiveness of Biologics combined with the conventional treatment. The findings reported in the presentation showed there were no differences between the two treatment groups. Given that conventional treatments may have unwanted side effects, switching to the Biologics treatment alone may be sufficient and could potentially minimize exposure to an ineffective treatment and reduce adverse drug reactions.

MSK Rehabilitation

Dr. Christine B. Novak's presentation was related to IMHA's MSK rehabilitation focus area and was entitled: "Biomedical & Psychosocial Factors Associated with Disability after Peripheral Nerve Injury". Dr. Novakis Associate Professor, at University of Toronto, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, scientist at the Toronto Rehab-UHN, and research Associate, Hand Program, Toronto Western Hospital, UHN. Dr. Novak discussed the implications of nerve injury, such as motor or sensory impairment which can impact daily activities and functions. She reported on the outcomes of a study evaluating the biomedical and psychosocial factors associated with disability in patients following traumatic upper extremity nerve injury. The findings discussed in the presentation showed that high levels of disability were associated with pain, pain catastrophizing, and numerous other biomedical and psychosocial factors. The main conclusion was that investigation of modifiable factors associated with disability may help to improve the quality of life of patients with traumatic nerve injury.

Bone

Dr. Faleh Tamimi's presentation was related to IMHA's bone focus area, and was entitled: "Cholinergic regulation of bone". Dr. Tamimi is a dentist and is Assistant Professor, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University. The research presented was based on the recent discovery that drugs used to improve memory can also improve the strength of bones. Examples were provided, such as the link between missing cholinergic receptors and development of osteoporosis. In Dr. Tamimi's study, Alzheimer's patients with hip fractures received acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors, which reduce the chemical that breaks down acetylcholine therefore increasing its availability. The findings reported in the presentation showed that patients receiving the drug had a lower risk of hip fracture incidence compared to the general population receiving other drugs commonly used for the treatment of osteoporosis. Similar results were observed in studies utilizing mice. The overall conclusion of the research was that stimulation of cholinergic synapses is associated with increased bone accrual and reduced risk of hip fractures.

Upcoming Changes to CIHR Programs

Dr. Jane E. Aubin, Chief Scientific Officer at CIHR, presented on "Signature Initiatives & Open and Peer Review Reforms". As Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Aubin oversees scientific affairs at CIHR and provides expert advice on matters relevant to science and technology, potential opportunities and emerging orientations and trends in the national and international health research community. As Vice-President, Research and Knowledge Translation Portfolio, she is also responsible for all aspects of adjudication of grants and awards at CIHR, and finally, as a member of the Science Council, she participates in the development, implementation and reporting on CIHR's research and knowledge translation strategy. She has been Scientific Director and CEO of the Canadian Arthritis Network of Centres of Excellence and, from 2007 to 2011, and Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis (IMHA). The goal of the presentation was to inform the young investigators of the upcoming changes to CIHR's programs and peer-review process.


Dr. Jane E. Aubin, Chief Scientific Officer at CIHR, presenting on Signature Initiatives & Open and
Peer Review Reforms.

Dr. Aubin began by highlighting the importance of knowing your funding agency and presented information pertaining to CIHR's annual expenditures (approximately $1 billion with ~70% of those expenditures in the open competition program) and forecasted expenditures. Dr. Aubin then described CIHR's strategic investments both in the current and upcoming year.

The presentation then shifted to CIHR's Roadmap Signature Initiatives, which aim to address complex problems that typically require multidisciplinary and multisectoral engagement involving numerous research priority areas. One common theme of the Signature Initiatives is their alignment with CIHR's strategy for patient-oriented research. Three CIHR signature initiatives were described by Dr. Aubin including personalized medicine, community-based primary healthcare, and inflammation in chronic disease. The objectives and highlights of these signature initiatives were covered in the presentation. The inflammation in chronic disease initiative was discussed as most closely associated to IMHA, its objective being the development of a unified strategy on inflammation that will support health research for the discovery and validation of common biomarkers, therapeutic targets, and inflammatory mechanisms amongst chronic diseases, with the ultimate goal to prevent and/or treat chronic disease by targeting inflammation and pain. Dr. Aubin noted that the young investigators should determine if and where they fit in these signature initiatives.

Next, Dr. Aubin addressed the upcoming open and peer-review reforms. The panel from the last CIHR international review made a series of recommendations and observations relating to the open suite of programs. Since then, CIHR has engaged the research community through a variety of consultation processes to inform them of the new design (which is still evolving). The proposed reforms will coalesce and simplify the 12 different programs in the open operating grant program into a simplified menu. Dr. Aubin then discussed the architecture and mechanics of the peer-review reforms. Some discussion took place regarding the young investigators and their role in and perceptions of the upcoming changes to CIHR programs (which have been positive).

Day 1 – Workshops


A workshop participant asking a question.

CIHR Grant Writing

Biomedical Research

This workshop was hosted by Dr. Jeff Dixon and Dr. Stephen Sims. Dr. Dixon is a Professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Division of Oral Biology at Western University. He also serves as Co-Director of the multicentre Joint Motion Program – a CIHR Training Program in Musculoskeletal Health Research and Leadership. He also serves on the editorial board of the journals Purinergic Signalling and Bone, and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of The Arthritis Society (and is a member of the IMHA IAB). Dr. Sims is Associate Vice-Provost, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, and a Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology at Western University. He is co-chair of the CIHR New Investigator C personnel committee, and is an Associate editor of the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology. The workshop goals were to increase the young investigators' knowledge of the biomedical grant writing process and to provide useful guidelines for future applications.

The workshop presentation was comprised in large part of materials from the grant writing handbook made available by the CIHR Institute of Genetics; a resource that young investigators were highly encouraged to consult. Topics presented at this workshop included the top eight things to do to write successful grants, as well as a common grant application timeline. Further, tips on writing style, and the structure of grant applications were provided as well as a discussion of the ethical issues that can arise when writing a grant. The workshop presentation finished with a list of resources useful for grant writing and a discussion on the importance of developing a unique writing style.

Clinical/Health Services/Population Health Research

This workshop was hosted by Dr. Gillian Hawker. Dr. Hawker is a Professor of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. She is the Physician-in-Chief at Women's College Hospital, where she holds the F.M. Hill Chair in Academic Women's Medicine. She is a member of the Performance Measurement Advisory Board of the Ontario Health Quality Council, and serves on the Board of the International Society for Osteoarthritis Research.

The workshop goals were to increase the young investigators' knowledge of the clinical/health services/population health research grant writing process and to provide useful guidelines for future applications. Dr. Hawker presented numerous topics important to the grant writing process, such as: selecting the right funding agency, developing the grant application package, writing the grant, timelines for preparations, and the grant review process. Dr. Hawker also presented some conceptual frameworks for clinical research grants, and information related to the organization of the written content of the grant (e.g., intro, methods, budget, etc.) and preparations and timelines relevant for the review process.

Managing Your Time and Research Team

Biomedical Research

TThis workshop was hosted by Dr. Marc Pouliot. Dr. Pouliot is a professor in the Department of Microbiology-Infectiology & Immunology at Laval University. He also serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee at The Arthritis Society (and is a member of the IMHA IAB).

This workshop aimed to help young investigators make informed and deliberate decisions when beginning their careers as biomedical researchers. Topics presented early in the workshop included effective time management and prioritizing. The presentation then shifted to topics such as strategic planning and dealing with colleagues. After presenting information and tips on efficiency and effectiveness, Dr. Pouliot discussed the many roles that young investigators play, noting that decisions made early in one's research career will set the stage for future research and opportunities.

Clinical/Health Services/Population Health Research

This workshop was hosted by Dr. John M. Esdaile. Dr. Esdaile is a Professor of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia, and Scientific Director, of the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada (and a member of the IMHA IAB). Dr. Esdaile presented the numerous responsibilities of a clinician-scientist. This workshop aimed to help young investigators make informed and deliberate decisions when beginning their careers as clinical/health services/population health researchers. Dr. Esdaile covered information on mentorship, hiring research assistants, and acquiring motivated students for the lab. He also discussed how the first five years of a young investigator's career are critical, setting the foundation for future success and development. Other key information presented included the importance of and tips for team building, planning mentorship, getting a head start on grant writing, and establishing protected time for research.

Interactive Mock Peer-review Panels

Two parallel sessions were held, one entailing a review of a CIHR biomedical grant application, and the second a review of a clinical/health services/population health grant application. The main goals of these sessions were to provide an "inside look" at the peer review process and to give the young investigators the opportunity to act as the main panel, to interact with and observe the peer review committee panel, and to score the grant under review; much in the same way that would occur during an actual grant review at CIHR. To facilitate the process, young investigators were provided with the grant prior to the session (as part of the forum package). The chair of the peer review panel for the biomedical grant under review was Dr. Stephen Sims, and the panel consisted of Dr. Jeff Dixon, Dr. Phillip Gardiner, Dr. Alain Moreau, and Dr. Marc Pouliot. The chair of the peer review panel of the Clinical/Health Services/Population Health grant under review was Dr. Monique Gignac, and the panel consisted of Dr. John Esdaile, Dr. Debbie Feldman, Dr. Gillian Hawker and Dr. Joy MacDermid. Each panel member played a specific role and had previous experience with the peer review process, including being a past and/or current member of CIHR peer review committees/panels.


The mock biomedical peer review committee panel: Dr. Stephen Sims, Dr. Marc Pouliot, Dr. Jeff Dixon,
Dr. Phillip Gardiner, and Dr. Alain Moreau (left to right).

Each session began with a description of the roles of the panel participants and the processes involved. In an actual peer review, although all committee members are supposed to read all applications, each grant is read in detail by three researchers on the panel. Two of those readers are "reviewers" and assign a score to the grant. As part of the peer-review process, the two reviewers must come to a consensus on the score that is assigned to a grant application. The third "reader" does not score the grant. The non-readers include the chair and the scientific officer. The workshop attendees served as other members of the peer-review committee, whose composite scores ultimately determine the final score assigned to a particular grant. Each workshop session then went on to simulate the process of peer-review. For example, the two reviewers each orally gave their score and a summary of the grant and the justification for their scores. The reader provided input on these points, playing the role of an extra "pair of eyes" ensuring the grant was read and comprehended in a fair way by both reviewers. The chair then brought the discussion back to the main panel (the young investigators playing that role) and after some debate and further discussion a consensus score between the two reviewers was reached (ranging from 0 to 5). The scientific officer then summarized the comments/reviews of the two reviewers, including the strengths and weaknesses of the grant. The young investigators, acting as the main panel, then had the opportunity to provide their scores (+ or – 0.5 allowable deviation from the consensus score) for the grant, which were then collected and averaged to arrive at a final score. The peer review ended with a discussion on whether the budget outlined in the grant application was justified and if amendments were required. The floor was then opened for questions; the young investigators asked many questions about the process and were very engaged.

Day 1 – Poster Mixer

76 Posters

The last activity of the day was the poster mixer, during which each young investigator presented a poster with findings from their recent research. There were two poster sessions with approximately 40 posters each. The goal of the poster mixer was to provide forum participants the opportunity to present their research, to learn about the work being done by their colleagues, and to network with one another. The poster sessions were very lively and resulted in a great deal of engaging discussion among attendees.


The Young Investigator forum poster session.

Day 2

Overview of Day Two

The second day of the YI forum began with a short address from IMHA's Interim Scientific Director Dr. Phillip Gardiner. Dr. Gardiner summarized the activities from the previous day and acknowledged the runners/walkers who took part in IMHA's morning "On the Move" fun run (3KM) or walk (1 KM) around the conference centre grounds. He then provided a brief overview of the days' activities and gave the podium to Dr. Marc Pouliot who introduced the first speaker of the morning's YI presentations.


Some participants of the "IMHA on the Move" fun walk/run.

Day 2 – Forum Presentations

IMHA-Relevant Young Investigator Research – A Brighter Future

Skeletal Muscle

Dr. Stephen Brown's presentation was related to IMHA's skeletal muscle focus area, and was entitled: "Functional remodeling of the multifidus muscle in response to experimentally induced disc degeneration". Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. Dr. Brown explained that low back pain may be the result of degeneration of the muscle in the lower back and referred to studies showing that disc injury leads to signs of muscle atrophy and degeneration. The purpose of the research discussed in the presentation was to determine if experimentally-induced vertebral disc degeneration causes progressive changes in the structural properties of rabbit multifidus muscle. The findings presented by Dr. Brown showed that experimentally-induced disc degeneration led to muscles that were much stiffer, showing a clear relationship between low back pain injury and muscle degeneration. In summary, the findings of this research could potentially provide an explanation for long-term chronic low back pain and lead to clinical interventions aimed at preventing or reversing these effects.

Skin

Dr. Jeff Biernaskie's presentation was related to IMHA's skin focus area, and was entitled: "Understanding the role of dermal stem cells in skin and hair follicle regeneration". Dr. Biernaskie is an Assistant Professor and CIHR New Investigator in the Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine at the University of Calgary. The hair follicle was presented as an accessible model of adult tissue regeneration, given that follicles undergo constant regeneration and degeneration. Dr. Biernaskie's research team aimed to determine whether hair follicle dermal stem cells play a role in skin wound healing. The findings presented showed that cells originating in the dermal sheath are recruited into the dermis following injury. In summary, the overall findings showed that mesenchymal cells residing in the hair follicle participate in wound healing. The floor was then opened for questions.

Oral Health

Dr. Maryam Amin's presentation was related to IMHA's oral health focus area, and was entitled: "Perceived and normative dental health status of African immigrants' children". Dr. Amin is an Assistant Professor and Acting Head of pediatric dentistry at the University of Alberta. The objective of the research study was to explore the dental status of young African children and to identify and measure parental awareness of their child's dental status. Little is known about factors affecting parental awareness and early detection of caries in children. In summary, the results of the findings presented showed that parental perception was not a reliable proxy of children's actual dental status and that regular pediatric dental visits should be promoted among parents of African origin. Intervention programs should focus on increasing the perceived need for preventive dental services. The floor was then opened for questions.

Day 2 – Workshops

What is Translational Research and Why is it Important

Dr. Alain Moreau hosted the translational research workshop. Dr. Moreau's pioneering research allowed for the development of the first tools for the early screening of scoliosis and the design of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent and cure idiopathic scoliosis (2 patents and others pending).The goal of the workshop was to help young investigators better understand the importance and relevance of knowledge translation in Canadian health research, as well as to provide guidelines on how to integrate it into research projects. Numerous upcoming programs at CIHR, such as the new Signature Initiatives, have a knowledge translation component.

The workshop began by Dr. Moreau defining translational research and research translation, followed by a discussion on clinical research and translational clinical research. Topics such as team-and patient-oriented strategies and the importance of collaborations with clinician-scientists and health economics were discussed. The workshop then shifted to the presentation of models outlining the different components of translational medicine, which entails the translation of evidence-based research findings into practice; a time consuming process. Other topics relevant to knowledge translation, such as the speed of translation and the barriers of translational research as well as tips to overcome them, were discussed. The workshop finished with a discussion on evolving public-health challenges, such as an increased Canadian aging population and the shift from acute and chronic conditions, and the importance of translational research in addressing these challenges. The floor was then open for questions.

Effective Presentations and Public Speaking

Dr. Monique Gignac hosted the workshop on effective presentations and public speaking. Dr. Gignac is a Senior Scientist with the Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research at the Toronto Western Research Institute and an Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto (and the Chair of the IMHA IAB). The goal of the presentation was to provide tips and guidelines to improve oral presentations to the public, with an emphasis on research presentations. Topics included: the importance of determining the purpose and audience of your presentations, mental preparation, and delivery. The floor was then open for questions.

Top Five Things to Do to Write Great Papers

Dr. Joy MacDermid hosted the workshop on ways to write great research articles. Dr. MacDermid is a Professor in Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University (Hamilton, ON), and is the Co-director of Clinical Research at the Hand and Upper Limb Centre (London, ON).She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed papers, 20 chapters and two books that focus on measuring and predicting musculoskeletal disability, and is co-editor of the textbook used internationally to teach evidence-based practice. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Hand Therapy and the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy and sits on the editorial board of Open Orthopedics (and a member of the IMHA IAB). The goal of the workshop was to provide tips and guidelines on writing scientific articles, which is a critical component of academic tenure. The presentation covered topics such as the importance of having good writing skills, tips and a variety of key elements to help the writing process. The presentation was a comprehensive review of writing skills and contained specific details and checklists important towards reaching a high level of skill in scientific writing and publication. The floor was then open for questions.

Day 2 – Closing Remarks

After the last workshop, the forum participants convened in the main auditorium where Dr. Gardiner made his closing remarks. Dr. Gardiner remarked how the Institute learned a lot about the young investigators pursuing research under the IMHA mandate and different focus areas and hoped they too had learned a great deal about health research in Canada. He wished the young researchers good luck in their future research activities and encouraged interactions with the Institute. He also thanked all the senior investigators and speakers who contributed to the forum, as well as the working group, the Institute Advisory Board, IMHA staff, and all other colleagues and stakeholders who contributed to the success of the forum.

Appendix 1: Members of the Planning Committee

Dr. Monique Gignac
Dr. Joy MacDermid
Dr. Alain Moreau
Dr. Marc Pouliot

Appendix 2: List of Participants

Maryam Amin
Mylène Aubertin-Leheudre
Jane Aubin
Limor Avivi-Arber
Ruth Barclay-Goddard
Lillian Barra
Lauren Beaupre
Gary Beechey
Jeff Biernaskie
Maya Boudiffa
Carmen Brauer
Mario Brondani
Steve Brown
Paul Bruno
Jason Busse
André Bussières
Duane Button
Suzanne Cadarette
R. Nicholas Carleton
An-Wen Chan
Andrea Clark
Ines Colmegna
Julie de Courval
Darren DeLorey
Francois Desmeules
Jeff Dixon
Elham Emami
Mark Erwin
John Esdaile
Debbie Feldman
Louis Ferreira
Andrea Furlan
Dany Gagnon

Cynthia Gagnon
Tanya Gallant
Phillip Gardiner
Cathie Garnis
Nathaly Gaudreault
Monique Gignac
Cheryl Glazebrook
Charles Godbout
Diane Gregory
Lisbet Haglund
Gillian Hawker
Linda Hiraki
Lisa Hoffman
Michael Hunt
Dwayne Jackson
James Johnston
Sunil Kalia
Peter Kannu
Mohit Kapoor
Thomas Koch
Saija Kontulainen
Roman Krawetz
Weiya Ma
Joy MacDermid
Chris MacDonell
Genevieve Mailhot
Monica Maly
Rhona McGlasson
Carlo Menon
Marc Milot
Alain Moreau
Monzur Murshed
Emily Neff

Christine Novak
Steven Passmore
Andrew Pelling
Theodore Perkins
Anthony Perruccio
Marc Pouliot
Kevin Power
Joe Quadrilatero
Dilson Rassier
Elizabeth Robson
Jean-Sebastien Roy
Joanna Sale
Heinrike Schmeling
Tannin Schmidt
Alex Scott
Cheryle Seguin
Reza Sharif Naeini
Stephen Sims
Walter L. Siqueira
Liz Stirling
Faleh Tamimi
Ken Tang
Brian Timmons
Irina Voronov
David Walton
Thomas Willett
Ryan Willing
Guangju Zhai
Xiufen Zheng
Youwen Zhou
Elena Zimina

Appendix 3: Forum Agenda

Sunday, June 10, 2012

4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Registration Kingbridge Conference Centre and Institute,
12750 Jane Street King City, ON
5:30 pm - 9:00 pm Buffet dinner provided for all participants at their leisure

Monday, June 11, 2012

Time Session Speaker
7:30 am Continental Breakfast
Poster Set-up
8:30 am Welcome Phillip Gardiner
Interim Scientific Director IMHA
8:40 am Keynote Address Alain Moreau
Plenary 1: IMHA Research - A Brighter Future
Chair: Marc Pouliot
9:00 am Arthritis Heinrike Schmeling
9:15 am MSK Rehabilitation Christine Novak
9:30 am Bone Faleh Tamimi
9:45 am Health Break
Plenary 2: Upcoming Changes to CIHR Programs
Chair: Phillip Gardiner
10:00 am Signature Initiatives, Peer Review Reform and Open Program Reform Jane E. Aubin
Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President Research, CIHR
10:30 am Question & Answer Period
Workshop 1: Grant Writing and Time Management Tips (2 parallel sessions)
10:55 am CIHR Grant Writing (Biomedical) Jeff Dixon and Stephen Sims
Managing your Time and Research Team
(Clinical/Health Services/Population Health Research)
John Esdaile
12:00 pm Networking Lunch with Mentors
1:00 pm CIHR Grant Writing
(Clinical/Health Services and Population Health Research)
Gillian Hawker
Managing your Time, Lab and Research Team
(Biomedical Research)
Marc Pouliot
Workshop 2: Interactive Mock Peer Review Panels
2:10 pm Panel #1: Review of a Biomedical Application
Chair: Stephen Sims
Jeff Dixon, Phil Gardiner, Alain Moreau and Marc Pouliot
Panel #2: Review of a Clinical/Health Services/Population Health Application
Chair: Monique Gignac
John Esdaile, Debbie Feldman, Gillian Hawker and Joy MacDermid
3:10 pm Peer Review Panel/Q & A
3:20 pm Health Break
Plenary 3: Poster Mixer
3:30 pm Posters 1-40 present
4:10 pm Posters 41-80 present
4:45 pm Closing Remarks Phillip Gardiner
6:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm Social/Pub Night

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

7:00 am IMHA on the Move Fun Run (3K) or Walk (1K)
7:30 am Continental Breakfast
8:30 am Overview Day Two Phillip Gardiner
Plenary 4: IMHA Research - A Brighter Future
Chair: Marc Pouliot
8:40 am Skeletal Muscle Stephen Brown
8:55 am Skin Jeff Biernaskie
9:10 am Oral Health Maryam Amin
Workshop 3: Making Research a Success (3 parallel sessions) - Each session offered twice
9:30 am What is Translational Research and Why is it important? Alain Moreau
Effective Presentations and Public Speaking Monique Gignac
Top Five Things to Do to Write Great Papers Joy MacDermid
10:30 am Health Break
10:50 am What is Translational Research and Why is it important? Alain Moreau
Effective Presentations and Public Speaking Monique Gignac
Top Five Things to Do to Write Great Papers Joy MacDermid
Plenary 5: Closing
Chair: Phillip Gardiner
11:55 am Feedback on the Meeting from Participants
12:05 am Wrap Up and Closing Remarks Phillip Gardiner
12:10 pm Networking Lunch with Mentors Monique Gignac
12:50 pm Board Shuttles to Airports (Shuttles depart for airport at 1:00 pm)

Appendix 4: CIHR Staff Involved in Organizing the Conference

Dr. Phillip Gardiner
Liz Stirling
Elizabeth Robson
Tanya Gallant
Julie de Courval
Marc R. Milot
Emily Neff

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