SPOR Network in Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations: Phase II

Questions

  1. How many member networks will be accepted for phase II?
  2. How much funding for each network is available from CIHR?
  3. What is required in the Phase II application that is different from the development phase, and what are the review criteria?
  4. What function will the Network Coordinating Centre have, and what level of funding is available to support it
  5. What is the prioritization process for future research projects?
  6. What is the intended composition of the overall pan-Canadian Network? (i.e., of the 11 member networks that have advanced to Phase II, how many member networks will be included in the eventual Pan-Canadian Network?)
  7. What will the National structure look like?

Answers

1. How many member networks will be accepted for phase II?

All member networks approved at Phase I are eligible to apply for Phase II.

2. How much funding for each network is available from CIHR?

In addition to the $75K funding available from CIHR for each of the Network Development Grants (Phase I), a total of $12.5M over five years is available from CIHR for the Network (matched 1:1 by partners). Of this $12.5M, a portion will be allocated to each member network for core operations (estimated at present time to be in the range of $50,000 to $100,000 per annum, depending on the size and need of the network), a portion will be allocated to a Network Coordinating Centre (budget amount to be confirmed), and the remainder will be allocated for the pan-Canadian Network's priority-driven cross-jurisdictional research projects. In all cases, CIHR's funding must be matched 1:1 by partners. Equal amounts of funding are available for all member networks.

3. What is required in the Phase II application that is different from the development phase, and what are the review criteria?

Phase II of the application process will focus on the ten network membership requirements. The specific review criteria are being developed (and will be informed by discussions from the Strengthening Workshop).

4. What function will the Network Coordinating Centre have, and what level of funding is available to support it?

A Network Coordinating Centre is envisioned as a value-add entity that will harness Canada's many national assets in primary and integrated care to provide a coordinated approach to the Network's communications, training, KT, patient and stakeholder engagement activities. The scope of activities of the Coordinating Centre will need to be determined in consultation with the member networks and other stakeholders. The level of funding from CIHR is still to be determined and will be informed by discussions from the Strengthening Workshop. CIHR's funding for the Network Coordinating Centre is required to be matched 1:1.

5. What is the prioritization process for future research projects?

The member networks will work together to determine common cross-jurisdictional areas of priority. In the shorter term, each member network will initially focus on new approaches to the delivery of primary and integrated health care both horizontally and vertically across the continuum to address individuals with complex care needs across the life course, showing capacity to evolve the member network's scope over time to include age groups from children to older adults; and, multi-sector integration of upstream prevention strategies and care delivery models.

Within these initial priority focus areas, the pan-Canadian Network will support research that addresses horizontal and vertical primary and integrated care priorities shared by several provinces/territories/federal jurisdictions and where there is value-added in a cross-jurisdictional research approach, including:

  • Knowledge of the comparative effectiveness and efficiency of different jurisdictional approaches to the same challenge;
  • More rapid and/or generalizable response to a priority area by employing a cross- jurisdictional approach; and/or
  • A more comprehensive evaluation of a priority area through the use of expertise and resources in multiple jurisdictions.

Research priorities for the agenda of the pan-Canadian SPOR Network in Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations are expected to be those where several member networks share a common challenge, and where they are using different service delivery approaches, and are investing substantially in these areas, including in their evaluation. This approach affords opportunities to provide a more comprehensive and informative evaluation of the particular attributes of approaches that are effective across jurisdictions, and how these are influenced by heterogeneous contexts (e.g., policy, organizational, health system delivery context). The use of common measures and outcomes will allow for more direct comparisons of promising approaches.

6. What is the intended composition of the overall pan-Canadian Network? (i.e., of the 11 member networks that have advanced to Phase II, how many member networks will be included in the eventual Pan-Canadian Network?)

All 11 member networks that have received a Network Development Grant will be working to strengthen their network to meet the ten network membership requirements as part of Phase I, and it is expected that all 11 member networks will be included in the overall pan-Canadian Network. Phase II and future activities related to the network will aim to build synergies across member networks, not to eliminate any of the networks.

7. What will the National structure look like?

The structure of the pan-Canadian Network will include the 11 jurisdictional member networks; a "Network Leadership Council" (with representation from all 11 member networks); a "National Coordinating Centre"; and a CIHR Initiative Management Office. Other entities, and a specific governance structure (including terms of reference, etc.) will be developed collaboratively with the member networks as the pan-Canadian Network is formed, beginning with discussions from the Strengthening Workshop.

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