SPOR Network in Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations: Network design

Questions

  1. How can the patient and partner needs be taken into account during the design phase?
  2. Can the networks partner internationally?
  3. Can the networks partner with the private sector?
  4. How can we move from a culture of competition to one of collaboration?
  5. How will the members networks align with each other across the country?
  6. What are the roles for each type of tripartite lead?
  7. What if one of the tripartite leads changes before the next phase?
  8. Will there be a collaboration platform for sharing work, discussing problems, planning projects?
  9. Seems the assumption is that research findings are not used in practice because they don't get these but my colleagues often know about findings but see them as this month's fad – "best practice keeps changing, why incorporate it". How do we respond to this?

Answers

1. How can the patient and partner needs be taken into account during the design phase?

Patients bring the perspective as 'experts' from their unique experience and knowledge gained through living with a condition or illness, as well as their experiences with treatments and the health care system. Citizens, patients and their caregivers can collaborate meaningfully through a range of roles in governance structures, priority setting and in generating research questions. Patients can also support researchers to recruit others and to reach out to under-represented groups.

2. Can the networks partner internationally?

Yes, member networks can partner internationally (though it is not required), particularly if it helps them to achieve the ten membership requirements (e.g., the requirement around Engaging Key Stakeholders in Primary and Integrated Care Re-Design) or undertake the research projects. Additionally, it is expected that once the pan-Canadian Network is established it may evolve to include international jurisdictions.

3. Can the networks partner with the private sector?

Yes. As outlined in the "Partnerships" requirement of the ten membership requirements, a member network's partnership funding can come from a variety of public, private for-profit and/or private not-for- profit sources (e.g., ministries of health, social services, and/or education; provincial health funding organizations; health charities; private foundations, etc.).

4. How can we move from a culture of competition to one of collaboration?

With the establishment of jurisdictional networks at phase I, the jurisdictionally-based competitive aspect is no longer a factor to consider. Moving forward, the intent is for funding partners and member networks to input into the further development of the mechanisms necessary to establish and implement the larger network of networks (e.g., Network Coordinating Centre, Governance, Funders' Consortium, etc.).

5. How will the member networks align with each other across the country?

It is envisioned that the member networks will work synergistically with one another and coordinate activities and priorities through a Leadership Council structure (with representation across all 11 member networks).

6. What are the roles for each type of tripartite lead?

Tripartite leadership is a key element of the network design. The roles of the tripartite leads are as follows:

  1. The clinical lead will be a recognized leader in primary and integrated health care delivery and have the capacity to mobilize the creative ideas, tacit knowledge and experience, and collaboration of health professionals across sectors of care and consumers towards a common goal of innovation and improvement in primary & integrated care delivery.
  2. The policy lead will be a senior-level experienced manager/leader within the health system who has the authority to influence or make decisions about policy/delivery of health services. He/she will assess the policy and system impacts of proposed innovations in care; identify the resource, management and policy changes that may be needed for effective transition to a new approach to delivery; co-design with the clinical lead the implementation and scale-up protocols for incorporating new approaches to primary & integrated care delivery.
  3. The science lead as a recognized research leader with expertise in primary and integrated models of care will be responsible for developing and coordinating expertise within the research community, develop the local and national research protocols for comparative effectiveness assessment; identify relevant indicator to assess outcomes, publish and disseminate new knowledge, in collaboration with the policy and clinical leads.

7. What if one of the tripartite leads changes before the next phase?

It is acceptable for a member network to change one or more of the tripartite leaders between the Network Development Grant Phase and Phase II.

8. Will there be a collaboration platform for sharing work, discussing problems, planning projects?

Once the Coordinating Centre is established, it will act as a platform to facilitate information exchange and discussions amongst the jurisdictions. In the interim, CIHR, through the Initiative Management Office, will provide that platform. The leadership council will also provide a mechanism for sharing ideas about research projects and methodological approaches. In addition, there will be an annual Network Forum planning, organized by the Network Coordinating Centre.

9. Seems the assumption is that research findings are not used in practice because they don't get these but my colleagues often know about findings but see them as this month's fad – "best practice keeps changing, why incorporate it". How do we respond to this?

Making decisions based on bodies of evidence (e.g., the Cochrane Collaboration; John Lavis' Health Systems Evidence) is preferable to making decisions based on single studies. Many of CIHR's programs and initiatives, including the SPOR Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations Network, strive to involve decision makers and clinicians throughout the research process from start to finish to help ensure the relevance of the research question, the appropriateness of the methods to the challenges faced in policy and practice, that local context is taken into account, etc.

The pan-Canadian Network will aim to foster real-time evaluation of policies and interventions with the aim of contributing to continuous and evidence-informed quality improvement.

Date modified: