Initiative Trajectoires de vie en santé (TVS) : Résultats de l'outil d'établissement de liens entre partenaires

Avis

L'information est fournie dans la langue dans laquelle le répondant l'a présentée.

Le tableau ci-dessous contient les renseignements de chercheurs et de personnes désirant échanger de l'information ou établir des collaborations en lien avec l'initiative Santé et productivité au travail.

Les renseignements publiés seront mis à jour chaque mercredi et seront accessibles jusqu’à la date limite de présentation des demandes (janvier 2017).

Coordonnées Pays Thèmes Expérience, connaissances, expertise ou contribution en lien avec l’Initiative Trajectoires de vie en santé

Wang, Peizhong Peter (en anglais seulement)
Professor
Memorial University of Newfoundland

pwang@mun.ca
Tél. : 709-746-2898

Canada

Primary:
Life-course epidemiology has become one of my research interests in the past few years. I am the sole author for the “Life Course Epidemiology" chapter (Chinese) in the newly released major reference book Epidemiology, (3 volumes, edited by Liming LI).

Secondary:
DOHAD and Diabetes

I graduated from Tianjin Medical University with a Bachelor degree in Medicine (1983), MSc in Epidemiology (1986). My PhD degree was from Dalla Nala School of Public Health at U of T in 2003. In the past 26 years, I have studied or worked in a number of Canadian academic institutions: University of Manitoba (1989-1991), University of Saskatchewan (1991-1995), University Health Network and U of T (1995-2004). In addition to my current tenured full professorship at Memorial University of Newfoundland, I also hold a number of academic appointments in China. As primary supervisor, I have supervised more than 20 Ph.D and MSc students in both Canada and China. Chronic disease epidemiology and epidemiological methods have been my main research interests for the past 20 years. I have been closely collaborating with my Chinese colleagues in a number of academic institutions in China since 2002. My peer-reviewed publications are available through researchgate.

Sun, Guang Dr. (en anglais seulement)
Memorial University
gsun@mun.ca
Tél. : 709-697-4162

Canada

Primary:
DOHAD, Intervention cohort design, Obesity, Diabetes, Mental Health

Secondary:
Cardiovascular disease, Other non-communicable disease-my laboratory has expertise in the measurement of human body composition, macro- and micro-nutrients in the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We have been a pioneering lab in the study of food addiction and its hormonal and nutritional factors in humans as well.

I have worked in the field of obesity and diabetes in adults and children over the past 15 years as an independent researcher. I have won 5 CIHR operating grants and one CFI equipment grant plus a good number of grants by Provincial, university and other funding agencies. I have established a large Newfoundland population (a few genetically homogeneous populations in North America) based study, called the Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study. The CODING study consists of 3352 adult Newfoundlanders. I have also established a Childhood Obesity Study funded by a CIHR pilot operating grant which is consisted of 130 families with a trio (parents and at least one obese child). I have published numerous papers on Diabetes, AJCN, Obesity, Plos One etc. My lab has the expertise in genome wide gene expression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle study, candidate gene approach, adipokines and gut hormones, nutritional factors (macro-, micro-nutrients) and recently in the study of food addiction.

Thind, Amardeep
Professor
Canada Research Chair in Health Services Research
University of Western Ontario

athind2@uwo.ca
Tél. : 519-661-2111 x22056

Canada

Primary:
Access to health care; equity

Secondary:
Obesity, Diabetes

 

Chevrier, Jonathan (en anglais seulement)
Assistant Professor
McGill University

jonathan.chevrier@mcgill.ca
Tél. : 514-398-8598

Canada
South Africa

Primary:
DOHAD, Intervention cohort design, Cardiovascular, Obesity, Diabetes,
Other Disease: Neurodevelopment, Growth, Immune Pathways (inflammation) Other Topic: Exposure to Environmental Pollution

Secondary:
Mental Health

I have been leading a birth cohort study in Limpopo, South Africa, for several years investigating environmental exposure and child health and development. Research infrastructure and facilities are already in place, we already have relationships with a number of stakeholders and we have trained highly skilled staff on site.

Dewey, Deborah (en anglais seulement)
Professor
University of Calgary

dmdewey@ucalgary.ca

Canada

Primary:
DOHAD

Secondary:
Obesity, Mental health, Other non-communicable disease
Other topic: Neurodevelopmental disorders

I am co-team lead on the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study. This pregnancy cohort study is following a cohort of approximately 2200 mothers and their children and 1500 fathers. We are investigating the impact of prenatal maternal nutrition, prenatal exposure to neurotoxicants and parental mental health on children's physical, cognitive and behavioural development, and brain structure and function. I am also working with my Tanzanian colleagues on a longitudinal research study that is investigating the impact of prenatal exposure to mercury and arsenic in artisanal and small-scale gold mining communities on children's health and neurodevelopment. Finally, am a Co-PI on a study that is examining the impact of maternal severe hypoglycaemia during pregnancy in mothers with Type 1 diabetes on children's neurodevelopment.

Fraser, William
Université de Sherbrooke
william.fraser@usherbrooke.ca
Tél. : 1-819 346 1110 ext. 12875
Canada Primary:
DOHaD, Intervention cohort design, Cardiovascular disease, Obesity, Mental Health, Other non-communicable disease
Abdelouahab, Nadia
Université de Sherbrooke
nadia.abdelouahab@usherbrooke.ca
Tél. : 1-819-346-1110 ext. 14107
Canada Primary:
DOHAD, Cohort design, Mental Health
I'm working on the effect Environmental Health. My research is on the effect of Obesogens chemicals on child health particularly on the child neurodevelopment.
Nepomnaschy, Pablo
Associate Professor and Director of the Maternal and Child Health Lab
Simon Fraser University
pablo_nepomnaschy@sfu.ca
Tel: 778-782-8493
Canada
Naidoo, Rajen
Associate Professor
University of KwaZulu-Natal
naidoon@ukzn.ac.za
Tel: 27312604385
South Africa

Primary:
Other non-communicable disease: childhood respiratory diseases, particularly asthma

Secondary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)
I am currently the PI of a birth cohort, the Mother and Child in the Environment (MACE). We currently have about 600 participants, and about 450 mother-child pairs, with ongoing recruitment. Pregnant females are recruited in early first trimester at public sector ante-natal clinics in Durban, South Africa. The objective of this longitudinal study is to determine the effects of ambient and indoor air pollution on childhood respiratory health, at different points, including in-utero, at birth, neonatal and in infancy, exploring the hypothesis that childhood respiratory outcomes may be as a result of impacts at these various points in the life-cycle. Key covariates being studied include nutritional factors, genetic and epigenetic changes and inflammatory biomarkers. Children are followed up at birth, with lung function tests performed at six weeks, clinical assessments at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years. Exposure assessments for ambient pollutants are done through land use regression modelling, and indoor exposure assessments are done through direct sampling and modelling Our research team consists of environmental epidemiologists, specialist paediatricians, molecular biologists, dieticians, environment scientists, with strong international collaboration in Europe, US and Australia.
Ncayiyana Jabulani
University of the Witwatersrand
Jabulani.Ncayiyana@wits.ac.za
Tel: +27 11 717 2273
South Africa Primary:
Intervention cohort design; Cardiovascular disease; Obesity; Diabetes
I have recently completed my PhD in epidemiology at University of North Carolina in the US. NCDs are reaching epidemic levels in South Africa. I am interested in developing intervention cohort.
Jakavula, Joyce
AgriAids SA (en anglais seulement)
jakavulalj@gmail.com
Tel: +27 82 852 8649
South Africa Primary:
Obesity, diabetes, Other non-communicable disease: Tobacco control and cessation support
I have over the 10 years working experience supporting scientific research programmes and general administrative management. In addition to my work experience, established African network and vast knowledge of tobacco.
Raghupathy Anchala (en anglais seulement), Associate Professor
Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad
raghupathy.a@iiphh.org
Tel: +91 9618010188
India

Primary: Cardiovascular disease and Intervention cohort design

Secondary: Obesity, Diabetes and Other: Respiratory health

Healthcare providers at the grassroots level need feasible, utilizable and integrated service delivery models and my PhD thesis work in public health and primary care domain from the University of Cambridge  (Cambridge Commonwealth Trust scholar and a recipient of Wellcome Trust – Public Health Foundation of India PhD Research Fellowship, 2010 - 2013) was built around developing, validating and testing the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a custom build e-health information technology tool (clinical decision support systems) for managing hypertension in resource constrained primary healthcare settings in India (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4881.8648). Key competencies developed during this process were (a) critical analysis of factors that drive the acceptability, appropriateness and feasibility of health interventions targeting the quality improvement of healthcare service delivery models in complex health systems, (b) performing situational analysis and needs assessment with key stakeholders (contextual analysis), using both qualitative and quantitative research skills, (c) designing, developing, pilot testing and validating a customized, integrated (with the existing work flow schedule of end users) and user friendly CDSS embedded with Indian clinical practice guidelines on hypertension that aimed for quality improvement in healthcare delivery in primary care, (d) developing methods for assessing the fidelity, implementation cost, coverage and sustainability (e) performing monitoring and evaluation of pragmatic community trials in real world community settings, (f) learning the principles underlying the trans disciplinary and culturally sensitive team work required for adaptation and knowledge dissemination among different stakeholders and beneficiary groups, and finally (f) developing techniques for evaluating process, output, and impact assessments in Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and health systems.  In the near future, my research would focus on establishing mutually inclusive North – South collaborations between health policy makers and ‘last mile implementers in primary healthcare delivery and health systems’ belonging to South East Asian countries and similar LMIC settings. Key questions that would be addressed would focus on (a) establishing methods for cross learning between the end users of healthcare interventions (ehealth and mhealth tools) and beneficiary perspectives on usefulness, suitability, adaptability, fidelity, replicability and sustainability of locally relevant and workflow integrated e-healthcare interventions that aim to strengthen quality of care and efficiency of healthcare delivery in complex and heterogeneous primary care health systems; (b) capacity building for implementation research in primary healthcare and public health workforce in the domains of non-communicable diseases (chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, mental health and cardio vascular conditions) and emerging and reemerging public health challenges; novel techniques for analyzing facilitating conditions and barriers for implementation of contextually relevant, culturally sensitive and resource oriented health interventions that not only improve quality and accessibility of healthcare delivery, but also help to build the public health competencies of healthcare workforce; (c) how and when to apply a systems thinking approach to design better ‘adaptive, responsive and locally tuned in’ health systems that address patient oriented outcomes and practitioners performance; and finally, (d) to establish a cohort among beneficiaries and healthcare workforce in tribal, urban slum and rural primary healthcare settings which would form an ideal platform for many researchers to explore associations and prognosis for a variety of risk factors, preventive and  cost effective healthcare interventions that address risk factors and disease management in NCDs and emerging public health challenges. 
Sankar Natesan (en anglais seulement), Professor
Madurai Kamaraj University
sankar.biotech@mkuniversity.org
Tel: +91-172-4990123, +919914469090
India

Primary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD) Cardiovascular disease

Secondary: Diabetes

My laboratory is interested in studying the role of Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs), a family of Ca2+ channels during cardiac remodeling process. The InsP3R2 is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart among the three types of InsP3R Ca2+ channels (InsP3R1, R2 and R3). The InsP3R2 is predominantly localized to the nuclear membrane and to a lesser extent in SR membrane of cardiomyocytes. The nuclear membrane enriched InsP3R2 Ca2+ channel regulates bi-directional Ca2+ release towards cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. Thus InsP3R2 regulate a diverse Ca2+ dependent signaling in both the compartments and contribute in the pathophysiology of the heart.  In animal models using physiological, biochemical, molecular biology applications we are trying to address the Ca2+ signaling pathways that are regulated by the InsP3R2 mediated Ca2+ release and its contribution in the development of cardiac hypertrophy followed by heart-failure. At present we are focusing on the regulation of Ca2+-calmodulin kinase IIdelta (CaMKIId) signaling pathways by InsP3R2 and its contribution in cardiac remodeling. We also working on intervention of InsP3R2 Ca2+ channel activity by "competitive inhibition" and "blocking inhibition" using peptides and antibodies respectively as a novel therapeutic agents to inhibit cardiac remodeling process.
Mahendra Bishnoi, Doctor
NABI (Nutrition Sciences and Technology)
mbishnoi@gmail.com
Tel: +91-172-4990123, +919914469090
 

Primary: Obesity

Secondary: Intervention cohort design and Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

Research theme: Nutritional insecurity is the biggest concern worldwide. It has two extremes, one is malnutrition/under nutrition and other is over nutrition/obesity and slowly but steadily both are gripping India.  Obesity is invariably associated with other metabolic complications like type 2 diabetes, cardiac complications and certain type of cancers. Current anti-obesity medications are pharmacological agents which can reduce or control weight. These drugs affect one of the fundamental processes of the weight regulation in human body. Over the years it has been seen that best and most effective options for overweight and obese individuals remain diet and physical exercise. It is important to have dietary regulations to prevent life style problems rather than to search for the treatment. Our group is taking up multiple approaches to understand adipogenesis and obesity and provide nutrigenomic and molecular evidence for the use of dietary/food constituents in its prevention (Theme 1: Receptor, diet and nutrigenomics;Theme 2: Food, Gut and metabolic health).  Expertise: Clinical pharmacology, Molecular Pharmacology, Animal models of obesity, Nutrigenomics etc. Also, our consortium partners, Advanced Pediatric Centre (APC),  PGIMER (cohort selection and clinical set up); NDRI (microbiology and probiotic),Department of Food Sciences, NABI (microbiology, pre and probiotic), Bioinformatics. Also we are pooling in partners from public health and other medical institutes in North India.  Focus for this grant: Life trajectory from pregnancy, infancy and childhood: gut microbiome as marker, preventive and therapeutic target for adolescent obesity. We will be happy to be partner in already developing consortium as contributor from North India, considering chandigarh and Punjab are hotspots for childhood obesity.
Manoj Kumar Mishra, Doctor
EGS Pillay Engineering College Nagapattinam T.N.,India
drmkm1969@rediffmail.com
Tel: 9976888658
  Primary: Other topic: Utilization of Waste and used against diseases causing  virus fungi and  bacteria, We made  survey in our district and found some many famous holy places are there and mostly all the follower offers flowers and other worship material but that is collected in bulk and thrown in lakes rivers or in road side which pollute the environment which causes various diseases. To solve this problem we develop new concept to utilize the waste in useful materials and create the awareness and organized programs for the students and Rural areas.
Bhagyavana
Mudigoudra, Asoociate Professor
Maharani Science Collage for Women, Bangalore
bhagyavana@gmail.com
Tel: 919480584366
India Primary:
Secondary:
 
Veeky Baths, Doctor
Birla Institute of Science and Technology – Pilani
veeky@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in
Tel: 0832-2580 436
India

Primary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Mental health, Other non-communicable disease, Other topic: Diagnostic Devices

Secondary: Cardiovascular disease

 
Joseph Daniel (en anglais seulement), Doctor
St. Joseph's College of Arts and Science
josephcdaniel@yahoo.com
Tel: 91 94433 61929
India

Primary: Other topic: Infectious diseases

Secondary:

Engaged in teaching and research in Microbiology Ph.D. in Seroprevalence of viral infections among tribal populations of South India Co investigator in a project on Hepatitis disease burden among tribal people funded by Indian Council of Medical Research
Gurcharan
Kaur, Professor
Guru Nanak Dev University
kgurcharan.neuro@yahoo.com
Tel: 091-9815450737
India

Primary: Intervention cohort design, Obesity, Mental health

Secondary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Cardiovascular disease

 
Sudha Ramalingam, Doctor
PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research,Coimbatore,India
drsudhapsg@gmail.com
Tel: 919894429646
India

Primary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Cardiovascular disease, Obesity and Diabetes

Secondary: Mental health and Other non-communicable disease:

I completed my MD in Community Medicine and also hold 2 postdoctoral fellowships at Stanford and University of Chicago respectively. I was also a Fulbright scholar at Harvard School of Public Heath working on Environmental Epigenetics with prof Andrea Baccarelli. I have been exposed to cohorts and data from various studies during my stay at Harvard. eg ELEMENT,. I am particularly interested in the role of Environment on causing Diabetes and Obesity.  I have been working in this field for the last 2 years and hold grants which look into the role of environmental toxins in the etiology of diabetes. We have a rural health training center which I directly supervise, catering  to about 30,000 population. We have the family details available and coded based on ICD electronically which can be tracked. We screen the population regularly through our extension clinics in the community and also specialty clinic at the rural center. In addition, we have a state of the art molecular lab with facilities to carry out basic molecular research which includes PCR, RTPCR, HPLC, Flow cytometry and cell culture facilities. As a clinician trained in epigenetics, public health and epidemiology and having access to a large population base, I feel this grant is a good opportunity to work with established investigators in DoHAD and develop this field in India which is presently facing the burden of NCDs.
Karen Grepin (en anglais seulement), Associate Professor
Wilfrid Laurier University
kgrepin@wlu.ca
519-884-0710 ext 3655
Canada Primary: Other topic: Health Economics, Household Surveys My research focuses on the use of formal health services in developing countries.  Relevant to this initiative, I am particularly interested in the development of tools to measure health care access and health inequalities using household surveys and other sources of data.  I am trained as a health economist.
M Salman Khan, Doctor
Integral university
mskhan@iul.ac.in
India

Primary: Cardiovascular disease

Secondary: Diabetes

 
Kaur Gurcharan, Professor
Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar
kgurcharan.neuro@yahoo.com
Tel: 9815450737
India

Primary: Intervention cohort design, Diabetes and Mental health

Secondary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Cardiovascular disease, Obesity

Our ongoing research work is aimed to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of cross talk between obesity and mental health, neuroplasticity and cognitive abilities which are of great concern for global healthcare system keeping in view the fact that obesity is now becoming pandemic in both developed and developing world. In India, prosperous states like Punjab are facing the challenge of overnutrition and that too of high fat content and a steep rise in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Many recent reports from our University and others estimate obesity prevalence in adults to about 25-30% (BMI≥30.0) in Punjabi population and the figures are comparable to the prevalence reported in developed western nations. We are currently working to identify obesity associated neuroinflammation targets in parallel study of brain and blood samples using animal model of high fat diet induced obesity and also introducing innovative interventions/approaches such as use of natural products to ameliorate the adverse effects of obesity. The outcome of this work may help to plan therapeutic strategies to curtail the progression of neuropathogenesis in obese subjects and reduce the severity of associated psychopathological and physical illness such as hypertension, T2D, CVDs etc. Some recent publications from our work with medicinal plants: Muskan Gupta and Gurcharan Kaur (2016) Aqueous extract of Withania sominifera leaves as potential anti-neuroinflammatory agent: a mechanistic study. J Neuroinflammation 22; 13(1):193-209.  Rachana Mishra, Shaffi Manchanda, Muskan Gupta, Taranjeet Kaur, Vedangana Saini, Anuradha Sharma and Gurcharan Kaur (2016) Tinospora cordifolia as a potential anxiolytic agent in sleep deprived Wistar rats: a mechanistic perspective. Scientific Reports; 6:25564. doi: 10.1038/srep25564.  Shaffi Manchanda, Rachana Mishra, Rumani Singh, Taranjeet Kaur and Gurcharan Kaur (2016) Aqueous leaf extract of Withania sominifera as a potential neuroprotective agent in sleep deprived rats: a mechanistic study. Mol. Neurobiol. 2016 Apr 1. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 27037574 Hardeep Kataria, Sushil Kumar, HarshitaChaudhary and Gurcharan Kaur (2016) Withania sominifera suppresses tumor growth of intracranial allograft of glioma cells. Mol Neurobiol. 53(6):4143-4158.
Subhasish Das (en anglais seulement), Doctor
SynbioPro Nutraceutix Inc.
sdas@triphasepharma.com
Tel: 918884550317
India

Primary: Diabetes and Mental health

Secondary:

  • 5 years post-PhD research experience in Bioprocess and Bioproduct Development
  • 2 patent applications in Probiotic related products, 9 publications, 1 book chapter (related to diabetes), several conference proceedings and counting
  • Process Modeling, DoE & Process Optimization, Microencapsulation, Pharmaceutical Analysis and Microbiology Techniques and down-steam processing
Deepesh Lad, Doctor
Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
deepesh.kem@gmail.com
Tel: 91-9417770112
India

Primary: Other non-communicable disease: Chronic lymphoproliferative disorders, leukemia

Secondary:

I have recently transitioned from a fellow position in a 30 bed transplant center doing 300 transplants a year to a faculty position at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, which is a 2000 bed premier academic center in India. This is a high volume referral center covering a population of approximately 60 million.  Our team of 4 faculties and 10 fellows manages on an average of 60-80 new patients and 300 follow-up patients of hematological malignancies per week in the out-patient department with inpatient capacity of 40 beds. The 10 bed BMT program performs on an average of 60-70 transplants per year. I am involved in clinical work overseeing the inpatient and outpatient management of leukemia, lymphoma, hematopoietic cell transplantation patients and patients with benign hematological disorders as well. I have been instrumental in setting up disease management and transplant protocols at our center. I also have clinical interests in long term follow-up of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation patients. I have trained with Dr. Mary Flowers at the Fred Hutch Cancer Center, Seattle.  My primary research interests are in the immunology of B-cell malignancies and transplantation. This is evident form my early career research work on immuno-biology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and autoimmune cytopenias presented at International meetings and published in peer reviewed journals. I have honed my research skills with Dr. Jan A Burger at MDACC, Texas as a part of the ASH visitor training program and with Dr. Megan Levings at Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver.
Daya Krishan Mangal, Doctor
IIHMR University (en anglais seulement), Jaipur
priyankasharma@iihmr.edu.in
Tel: 91 141 3924700
 

Primary: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Cardiovascular disease, Obesity, Diabetes and Mental health

Secondary: Intervention cohort design

 
Sangeeta Choudhury
Sir Ganga Ram Hospital (en anglais seulement), New Delhi
dr.sangeeta.sgrh@gmail.com
Tel: 91 11 42251629
India

Primary: Diabetes Cardiovascular

Secondary: Obesity

The Healthy Life Trajectories Initiatives prioritize collaborative initiative promoting innovative research and development activities for translational interdisciplinary research targeting demographic changes. Based on this theme, we propose to undertake study on one of the major global disease, the Type 2 diabetes which causes a huge socio-economical impact/ burden in any country across the world. The recent shift towards diabesity (obese diabetes) in developing country is mostly due to rapid changes in lifestyle, diet, environment including urbanization.
Presently, our team is conducting an interventional study wherein the objective is to look at the efficacy of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in management of T2DM in morbidly obese patients. The results till date indicate a metabolic effect represented by incretins (GLP-1/ PYY/Ghrelin) show favorable outcome with reference to resolution of diabetes (HBA1c). Based on these results, we propose to further study the association of gut microbiota, both with reference to lean and obese population. If one confirms the association of specific groups of microbes with leanness, then it opens up the possibility of having a novel, natural means of controlling obesity. Cultivating such microbes to develop a pre/probiotic therapeutic option could pave ways also to control various co-morbid conditions of diabetes. Thus, the outcome of the collaborative study can have a very large potential socio-economic impact not only on the Indian sub-continent that is moving towards being named as one of the largest diabetic country for adult-onset diabetes mellitus, but also across other populations of the world.

Sasidhar Manda
Chief Scientist
Apollo Hospital Educational and Research foundation
sasidhar@aherf.net
Tel: 914023606060

 

Primary:
Cardiovascular disease, Obesity, Diabetes

Secondary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

 

Masud Rana
University of Saskatchewan
masud.rana@usask.ca

Canada

Primary:
Obesity

Secondary:
Other topic: Modeling variation in obesity due to the variation in environments.

 

Jyothi Chakrabarty
Associate Professor
Manipal College of Nursing Manipal
jyothi.r@manipal.edu
Tel: 919880078542

 

Primary:
Obesity, Other non-communicable disease: Cancer

 

Comparison of dietary factors and physical activity of obese and non-obese working women was done in the year 2006 The publications are: 1. Jyothi. R. K Prevalence of obesity and comparison of lifestyle practices of obese and nonobese women. Asian Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, vol.17 (1). January 2009 2. Jyothi. R. K, Baby S Nayak. A case-control study of dietary habits, physical activity and risk for abdominal obesity among working women. Calicut medical journal 2010; 8(2):e2 Pranayama (Yogic breathing techniques) were tested for cancer related fatigue among breast cancer patients between 2009 to 2014. Related publications are: 1. Jyothi Chakrabarty, M. S. Vidyasagar, Donald Fernandes, Vinutha Bhat4,Nagalakshmi5, Ganapathi Joisa and Shreemathi S. Mayya. Effectiveness of pranayama on the levels of serum Protein thiols and glutathione in breast cancer Patients undergoing radiation therapy : A randomized controlled trial. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2013; 57(3): 225–232 2. Chakrabarty J, Vidyasagar MS, Fernandes D,Joisa G, Varghese P, Mayya S. Effectiveness of pranayama on cancerrelated fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: A randomized controlled trial. Int J Yoga 2015;8:47-53 3. Chakrabarty J, Vidyasagar MS, Fernandes D, Mayya S. Emotional aspects and pranayama in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: A randomized controlled trial. Asia Pac J Oncol Nurs 2016;3:199-204.

Pritam Mohanty, Dr (en anglais seulement)
Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences
KIIT University

Bhubaneswar
drpritammohanty@gmail.com
Tel: 91-9777453388

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Other non-communicable disease: Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate, Carniofacial Orthodontics and syndromic Patients

Secondary:
Developmental

I am craniofacial Orthodontist working at Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India as an Associate Professor. I did Fellowship in Clinical Orthodontics from Chang Gung University,Taiwan. In my clinical experience, cleft lip and palate is a challenging disorder to tackle in a clinical setup. My view is to prevent the condition rather than handling it later. In developing countries like India, awareness for Cleft lip and Palate is not present and is considered as a social stigma. Lack of education and health awareness leads to this condition as general Indian population is generally not aware about the risk factors such as nutritional deficiency, teratogenic medications, deleterious habits and genetic predisposition.

Priyanka Parte, Dr (en anglais seulement)
National Institute for Research in Reproductive health (ICMR)
partep@nirrh.res.in
Tel: 9122 24192005

 

Primary:
Other non-communicable disease: Male infertility

Sperm motility is indispensable for normal procreation. It is one of the most easily observable phenomena but the least understood. It is estimated that about 20% of the couples are infertile and about half of this is attributed to the male partner. Given that about 40% of the male infertility is due to poor sperm motility underscores the importance of research in this direction. Additionally, understanding flagellar motility has wider implications as most ciliopathies such as Situs inversus, Hydrocephalus, Blindness, Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Cyst formation, are often found to be associated with asthenozoospermia depending on the severity of the disorder. In keeping with the mandate of research being conducted at the Institute, my research is focused on understanding the pathophysiology of poor sperm motility. Using clinical material (sperm from asthenozoospermic individuals), we identified the phosphoproteins and the pathways relevant to sperm motility and those that can be altered in asthenozoosperm resulting in the manifestation of poor sperm motility and consequently infertility in men. We have also identified the signature molecules therein. Of these signature molecules, were four alpha tubulin isoforms which were differential expressed in individuals with poor sperm motility; an increase in TUBA3E and TUBA4A and decrease in TUBA3C and TUBA8. Isoforms TUBA3C, TUBA4A and TUBA8 are reported to be abundantly present in the testis. We further demonstrated the differential expression of these isoforms in the normal- and asthenozoosperm at protein and transcript level. Investigation of acetyl α tubulin expression in asthenozoosperm revealed a reduction in tubulin acetylation in sperm of these individuals. The decrease in TUBA3C and increase in TUBA4A transcripts, both being acetylable isoforms of alpha tubulin could be elucidated on the basis of transcription factors binding to the promoters of the respective isoforms and the reduction in acetyl alpha tubulin in asthenozoosperm was explained on the basis of decrease in TUBA3C and the association of HDAC6 with TUBA4A. However the presence of HDAC6 on sperm had not been hitherto reported. Our study demonstrated the presence of HDAC6 transcript and protein in rat testicular- and caudal-sperm and further we showed that HDAC6 interacts with alpha-tubulin in the mid piece and principal piece of sperm flagella. Using HDAC inhibitors we further demonstrated convincingly that HDAC6 in sperm is catalytically active and inhibitors of HDAC6 increase acetylation and restrict sperm motility. On the basis of our observations with the human and rat sperm and the available literature we conclude that HDAC6 may be required to maintain dynamic instability in sperm flagella, and that dynamic instability may be a pre-requisite for normal sperm motility. We have cloned the full length rat hdac6 gene which will be used to study the effect of hdac6 overexpression on spermatogenesis. Our studies with CDYL indicate that it may moonlight as a tubulin acetyltransferase in sperm. Our data suggests that reversible acetylation of α-tubulin in sperm is brought about by HDAC6 and CDYL and it has a significant role in sperm function Our characterization studies on GRP78 which was another of the proteins observed to be differentially phosphorylated in asthenozoosperm, provides novel information on the spatial distribution of phosphorylated GRP78 during sperm maturation. Based on our observations we have proposed the putative dynamic changes in GRP78 phosphorylation in spermatozoa during its maturation. The observation of reduced phosphorylation of GRP78 in the asthenozoosperm and identification of the phosphoforms reduced, suggests relevance of GRP78 phosphorylation to sperm function. As a part of our efforts towards indigenous technology development, we have initiated a study which is a collaborative project entitled Development of a microfluidic device for good quality sperm selection for Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART). We wish to work on the implications of defective chromatin condensation in male sperm on the reproductive outcome and early embryonic development for which I am interested in seeking collaboration.

Santhrani Thakue, Dr (Ph.D)
Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam
Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh
drsanthrani@gmail.com
Tel: 9849077507

India

Primary:
Mental health

Secondary:
Other topic: Drug induced adverse effects

 

Pramodkumar Verma, Dr
drpbverma@gmail.com
Tel : 9825577879

India

 

 

Kamal Rawal, Dr.
JIIT
kamal.rawal@gmail.com
Tel: 9350530833

India

Primary:
Cardiovascular disease, Obesity, Diabetes

Secondary:
Intervention cohort design, Other non-communicable disease:

Summary of Research Work: Idea Proposed: The current public health challenges include increasing health care costs, rising incidences of chronic diseases and shortage of physicians as well as nursing staff. Resolving these higher order challenges requires paradigm shift from existing hospital/doctor centric medical system to a new system of medicine. This new system lay emphasis on empowering individuals to self monitor as well as to self manage health & disease conditions. This new information revolves around data driven technologies and use information from individual genome, proteome, metabolome, biophysical measures and environment to predict, prevent, diagnose and treat disease. Chronic non communicable diseases (CNCDs) such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis affect millions of patients across the world. Metabolic syndrome X is collection of clinical conditions which includes obesity, diabetes, hypertension & dyslipidemia. The major risk factors for CNCDs & metabolic syndrome are attributed to lack of physical activity and poor nutrition. Large number of research studies has provided irrefutable evidence of the effectiveness of regular physical activity in the primary and secondary prevention of several chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, obesity, depression, falls in elderly and osteoporosis) and premature death. In recent years, large numbers of people across the world are tracking themselves for diseases, symptoms, medications, body weight, sleep quantity and quality, blood test results, blood pressure, nutrition, habits, and mood using smart phones, wearable technologies or apps. A new term ‘Quantified Self’ has been coined to label growing social community of self trackers. Wearable technologies can be defined as set of physical things embedded with electronics, software, sensors and connectivity protocols to enable exchange of data so as to perform automated, meaningful and practical functions for humans. The example includes activity trackers, google glass, smart watches, smart textiles (References) etc. Wearable sensor systems have the potential to generate complex and heterogeneous datasets to enable evidence-based proactive health management. In this project, we propose to develop an integrated system to combine sensors, physiological data, machine learning and data generated from multiple high-throughput dynamic omics methods. This novel framework shall be used to interpret healthy and diseased state. One of the potential applications is design of automated system to motivate elderly to improve their physical activity using reminders in regional languages generated from smart clothing or activity trackers. We also propose to develop a new elderly fall detection/protection system using this framework.

Bharati Kulkarni, Dr.
National Institute of Nutrition
dr.bharatikulkarni@gmail.com
Tel: 919989145570

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

Secondary:
Cardiovascular disease, Obesity, Diabetes, Other non-communicable disease, Other topic: Sarcopenia, osteoporosis, body composition

I am a pediatrician with over 15 years of research experience in maternal and child nutrition at National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India. I have completed my MPH from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, USA and PhD from Queensland University of Technology, Australia. My PhD focused on assessment of the impact of early life nutrition on lean body mass and muscle strength in adulthood in participants of a long-term cohort - Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study (APCAPS). I have been working with colleagues from UK on follow up of this cohort which is experiencing nutrition transition as a result of rapid urbanization of the cohort villages. Although undernutrition is still prevalent in this community, recent lifestyle changes pose an imminent risk of metabolic syndrome and associated chronic diseases. The risk is particularly enhanced due to peculiar body composition of Indians characterized by high fat mass and low muscle mass. I am specifically interested in developing and testing interventions that would enhance muscle mass during growth which would result in long term health benefits.

Suresh Munuswamy, Assistant Professor
PHFI Indian Institute of Public Health - Hyderabad
s.munuswamy@iiphh.org
Tel: 919959560333

India

Primary:
Intervention cohort design, Diabetes

Secondary:
Obesity, Mental health, Other topic: Developing Mobile platform/ wearable based sensing cohort. Developing AI based chat to engage with mothers for a health modifying dialog.

Design and development of AI based automated chat bots for engaging with mothers during pre-conception to pregnancy, infancy and childhood. The bots are being designed for risk assessment at every stage and provide individual and customized and location specific advise.

Narendra Kumar Arora, Professor
The INCLEN Trust International
nkarora@inclentrust.org
Tel: +91 11 47730000

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Obesity

Secondary:
Intervention cohort design, Diabetes

In 2009, we established a Demographic Development And Environmental Surveillance Site (DDESS) in Palwal district, Haryana encompassing 51 contiguous villages from 3 blocks with over 200,000 population. It is a cross-sectoral initiative to develop novel, innovative and real world solutions that helps to create healthier, prosperous and sustainable communities. In 2012-13, through a population census geo-spatially coded data banks has been generated for entire people and location that helps to monitor changes in physical, built and spatial environments. Between 2011-15, in 9 villages in this location, a cohort of 611 children was established entitled as Brain to Society (BtS) project with below mentioned objectives (funded by ICMR-CIHR grant). Presently, this study is technically over however data analysis is progressing. Key objectives of this cohort study was to: 1. To examine the behavioral, body fatness/weight and nutritional risk for childhood obesity and associated complications (MetS, T2D, and CVD) at baseline and 2-year follow-up changes in the sentinel sample that is exposed to multi-level Whole-of-Society transformation. - Individual-level BtS Diagnostic 2. To examine the direct impact of individual differences in genetic and neuro-cognitive predisposition for responsiveness to lifestyle-shaping environmental exposure conditions (i.e., endophenotype for environment responsiveness) on behavioral, body fatness/weight and nutritional risk for childhood obesity (MetS, T2D, and CVD) and their moderating role on contextual differences in such environmental exposure conditions. - Individual-level BtS Diagnostic 3. To proceed to foundational (qualitative and quantitative) work for subsequent computational systems science modelling (systems dynamic) of the relationships between aggregate-level measures of lifestyle-shaping environmental exposure conditions prevailing in communities (where sentinel samples live) and the organizational and collective choices made by community-level stakeholders (including health, social, and economic inputs, processes, outcomes and underlying mechanisms and feedbacks) - Societal-level BtS Diagnostic 4. To proceed to foundational work for subsequent computational systems science modelling (systems dynamic) of the relationships between aggregate-level measures of the caloric and nutritional quality of food supply, demand and consumption, and changes in agriculture and food systems practices, strategies and policies. - Societal-level BtS Diagnostic

Rashmi H Mallappa, Scientist
ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute
rashmi.ndri@gmail.com
Tel: 91-7082033557 / 91-2259186

India

Primary:
Intervention cohort design, Obesity, Diabetes

Secondary:
Mental health

I am having research/teaching experience of 5 years in the field of microbiology and molecular biology, and currently working in the area of Gut Microbiota , Metagenomics and Metabolomics and would like to use probiotics and prebiotics as dietary interventions in the management of Metabolic diseases like obesity and Type 2 Diabetes. My secondary area of research is to study the role of gut microbiota and gut -Brain axis in the neural diseases

Anuradha Khadilkar, Deputy Director
Hirabai Cowasji Jehangir Medical Research Institute
anuradhavkhadilkar@gmail.com
Tel: 919850244305

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

Secondary:
Intervention cohort design, Obesity

I am a paediatrician who is involved in the field of growth in children (we have been a part of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics Growth Charts for Indian children), childhood obesity(we have reported prevalence of childhood obesity in urban Indian children, defined adult equivalent cutoffs for screening for obesity, suggested cut-offs for body fat percentage (by DEXA), waist circumference and triceps skin fold thickness), metabolic risk in adults and children and nutritional deficiencies in children such as vitamin D, micronutrients, etc. Our work in growth disorders and obesity in children has given us a lot of insight into healthy trajectories for children. One of my colleagues is a paediatric endocrinologist who shares my keen interest in research and treats a range of obesity and metabolic disorders in children. At our centre, we have postdocs, PhD students and nutritionists who would be well suited to work in such a project. We also have access to rural, urban and slum dwelling communities for carrying out a project such as the Healthy Life Trajectories Initiative. We have conducted several collaborative studies in India and are working with several centres in India at present. Our previous research work, with our understanding of growth, obesity and metabolic risk, our network and collaborations together with a scientist who has experience in a large cohort study are, I feel, suitable for the current project.

Anuradha Khadilkar, Deputy Director
Hirabai Cowasji Jehangir Medical Research Institute
anuradhavkhadilkar@gmail.com
Tel: 919850244305

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

Secondary:
Intervention cohort design, Obesity

I am a paediatrician who is involved in the field of growth in children (we have been a part of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics Growth Charts for Indian children), childhood obesity(we have reported prevalence of childhood obesity in urban Indian children, defined adult equivalent cutoffs for screening for obesity, suggested cut-offs for body fat percentage (by DEXA), waist circumference and triceps skin fold thickness), metabolic risk in adults and children and nutritional deficiencies in children such as vitamin D, micronutrients, etc. Our work in growth disorders and obesity in children has given us a lot of insight into healthy trajectories for children. One of my colleagues is a paediatric endocrinologist who shares my keen interest in research and treats a range of obesity and metabolic disorders in children. At our centre, we have postdocs, PhD students and nutritionists who would be well suited to work in such a project. We also have access to rural, urban and slum dwelling communities for carrying out a project such as the Healthy Life Trajectories Initiative. We have conducted several collaborative studies in India and are working with several centres in India at present. Our previous research work, with our understanding of growth, obesity and metabolic risk, our network and collaborations together with a scientist who has experience in a large cohort study are, I feel, suitable for the current project.

Sarang Deo, Associate Professor
Indian School of Business
sarang_deo@isb.edu
Tel: 914023187378

India

Primary:
Intervention cohort design

Secondary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD)

Sunil Sazawal has more than 30 years of experience working in India and Africa on interventions of Public Health Importance that would impact survival , growth and development of children. The work regarding zinc as an intervention for diarrhea was eventually adapted by the programs both globally and in India. The group under the leadership of Dr Sazawal has undertaken multiple clinical trials , maintains cohorts of children in India and Africa and has expertise in content areas of child growth, development, morbidity and mortality as well as expertise in epidemiology especially community based research and statistics relevant to clinical trials cohort studies.

Nita Bhandari, President and Director
Society for Applied Studies, New Delhi, India
nita.bhandari@sas.org.in
Tel: 911146043751

India

Primary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Other topic: Community-based research in child health and nutrition with special focus on nutritional intervention trials to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality, nutrition-infection interactions and vaccine trials to prevent childhood infectious diseases.

Our group has the experience and the skills to recruit large cohorts and follow them up. SAS was the lead group from India for the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study which led to the development of the current growth standards for children. In this study, pregnant women were identified through a door-to-door survey in 58 neighbourhoods in Delhi, followed up through pregnancy and delivery and their infants enrolled and followed up till 2 years of age. The loss to follow up rates in our studies are usually less than 3%. Our group is amongst the few in India that conduct community-based or cohort studies with large sample sizes, the largest cohort was ~97000 under twos followed up for one year. The team has had success in trials of behaviour change interventions in breastfeeding, complementary feeding and integrated management of neonatal and childhood illnesses (IMNCI) practices. SAS has access to populations in the community in the urban areas of Delhi, several districts in Haryana and Himachal Pradesh in India.

Moshe Szyf
McGill University
moshe.szyf@mcgill.ca
Tel: 1-514-398-7107

Canada

Primary:
Other topic: epiegenetics

Secondary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Mental health, Other topic:

I am interested in epigenetic mechanisms and how they mediate teh effects of exposure on long term phenotypes in humans as well as animal models. i am also interested in developing epigenetic biomarklers thart could early predict risk. My interest are in epigenetic mechanisms involved in cancer, diabetes and behavioral disorders.

Kavita Gupta, Dr, BSC, MBBS,MD
Pt.J.NM.Medical college Raipur CG India
guptakavita1234@gmail.com
Tel: 919425210051

India

Primary:
Other topic: epiegenetics

Secondary:
Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DoHAD), Intervention cohort design, Mental health, Other topic:

Recent project work on fully Automatic, self operable, bio imaging device for ECG recording, First part is completed waiting for second part

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